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I'm struggling to get my Behavior class to use an object instance in the callbacks.

class SomethingBehavior extends ModelBehavior
{
     public function setObject($obj)
     {
         // do stuff
     }

     public function afterFind(Model $model,$results,$primary)
     {
        // use the $obj reference set above
     }
}

Now I need the Model class to call setObject(..) before any find operations are performed. So ideally I would just assign the object I need in the constructor.

class Document extends AppModel
{
    //.....
    public function __construct($id,$table,$ids)
    {
        parent::__construct($id,$table,$ds);
        $this->Something->setObject(new MyClass());
    }
}

My problem is that the Behavior object isn't yet configured, and I get a not an object error when trying to use it.

I can't find any callback method for Models like in Components. For example, there is no setup or initialize method.

How can I assign the object I need to the Behavior?

share|improve this question
    
"Document implements AppModel"? You mean extends, right? –  mark Jan 31 '13 at 22:59
    
@mark thanks, it's fixed. –  Mathew Foscarini Jan 31 '13 at 23:07
    
Yeah as @mark writes. You have to extend the AppModel class to be able to use parent::.... Also you cannot use $this->Something... without creating the object first. –  Bjørne Malmanger Jan 31 '13 at 23:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't seem to have worked with behaviors much. Try to use the containable, tree or other core or plugin behaviors, then you will soon figure out the basics.

First of all, behaviors are attached to models (and since 2.3: loaded), not the other way around. A model then gets "richer" in functionality.

Either statically be using public $actsAs or dynamically using

$this->Behaviors->attach('Something'); // since 2.3: load() instead of attach()

It can directly access the behavior methods. Lets say we have a method foo() in your behavior. You can then call it from your model as

$this->foo($foo, $bar);

Or from your controller as

$this->Document->Behaviors->attach('Something')
$this->Document->foo($foo, $bar);

Awesome, right? The behavior method usually has this declaration:

public function foo(Model $Model, $foo, $bar) {
    $alias = $Model->alias;
    // do sth
}

As you can see, you always pass the model into it implicitly (as first argument automatically passed). You can access all its attributes.

And do not touch the constructor of the model. no need to do that.

If you really need to pass an object in at runtime, why does your approach not work?

public function setObject(MyClass $obj) {
    $this->Obj = $obj;
}

Now you can internally use the object from your behavior methods

public function doSth(Model $Model) {
    $this->Obj->xyz();
}

Also this might not be the most elegant approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I get all of that. The problem is that the Behavior can only be configured via an Array. What if you need your Behavior to use an XML reader object, or some other Object that only the Model knows which class to create. For example, the setObject() method would only accept objects that implement a needed interface. Right now, there isn't a way for the Model to finish configuring the Behavior. –  Mathew Foscarini Jan 31 '13 at 23:52
    
I updated the bottom of my answer with the missing part to your solution you already got started. –  mark Jan 31 '13 at 23:58
    
My problem is I need to call setObject from the Model before any model find operations are performed, because the Behavior handles the beforeFind callback. –  Mathew Foscarini Feb 1 '13 at 0:02
    
actually, now that I'm thinking about this, maybe I can call setObject in the Model's beforeFind callback. There might be a chance that callback is executed before the beforeFind of Behaviors. –  Mathew Foscarini Feb 1 '13 at 0:03

You never set the something member of the Document class. You either need to instantiate it inside the constructor, or pass it in.

Personally, I would do something like this:

class Document extends AppModel
{
    private $behavior;

    public function __construct($id,$table,$ids, ModelBehavior $behavior)
    {
        parent::__construct($id,$table,$ds);
        $this->behavior = $behavior
        $this->behavior->setObject(new MyClass());
    }
}

$doc = new Document(..., new SomethingBehavior());

Or better yet, you could even separate it further by doing:

class Document extends AppModel
{
    private $behavior;

    public function __construct($id,$table,$ids, ModelBehavior $behavior)
    {
        parent::__construct($id,$table,$ds);
        $this->behavior = $behavior
    }
}

$behavior = new SomethingBehavior();
$behavior->setObject(new MyClass());

$doc = new Document(..., $behavior);

That way, there is less magic going on in the constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
autsch. thats not cakephp. I guess you havent worked with it much, have you? –  mark Jan 31 '13 at 23:28
    
yea, this is a CakePHP specific issue related to how it loads Behaviors, but your answer points out one of the things I don't like about CakePHP. It's funky magic ways of associating objects together at run-time. It might have been a great benefit in PHP 4, but it's kind of not the PHP 5 way of doing things. –  Mathew Foscarini Jan 31 '13 at 23:56

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