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What is the C# Using block and why should I use it?

So I've just noticed that at msdn examples and some stackoverflow questions there were answer where the using statement is used before the streamwriter etc, but what is actually the benefit? Since I've never been taught/told/read any reason to use it.

            using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path)) 
            {
                while (sr.Peek() >= 0) 
                    Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
            }

Instead of:

            StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path);
            while (sr.Peek() >= 0) 
                Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
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marked as duplicate by Dave Zych, 500 - Internal Server Error, Daniel Brückner, horgh, John Koerner Feb 1 '13 at 0:17

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The using block calls the Dispose method of the object used automatically, and the good point is that it is guaranteed to be called. So the object is disposed regardless of the fact an exception is thrown in the block of statements or not. It is compiled into:

{
    StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path);
    try
    {
        while (sr.Peek() >= 0) 
            Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
    }
    finally
    {
        if(sr != null)
            sr.Dispose();
    }
}

The extra curly braces are put to limit the scope of sr, so that it is not accessible from outside of the using block.

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It is actually compiled into a try-finally block. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jan 31 '13 at 23:37
    
@DanielHilgarth absolutely. I was editing the answer. –  Sina Iravanian Jan 31 '13 at 23:39
1  
@CSharpStudent it depends on how IDisposable is implemented. It usually frees the resources used. In our StreamReader example trying to read from the stream again, would result in an exception of that kind. Note that a disposed object is different from a null object. –  Sina Iravanian Feb 1 '13 at 0:03
1  
@CSharpStudent Well, first you notice some symptoms, such as excessive slowness, and so on. Then you use a profiler (such as RedGate's ANTS Memory Profiler) and you see that some big objects are never garbage collected or disposed of. –  Sina Iravanian Feb 1 '13 at 0:16
1  
There is another detail to the code - in an using block it is not valid to perform an assignment to the variable holding the disposable object while in the code above nothing prevents changing the value of sr from inside the try block. –  Daniel Brückner Feb 1 '13 at 1:03

using statement works on stuff that implement IDisposable interface.

.net will garantee that the StreamReader will be disposed.

You don't have to worry about closing or managing it further: just use what you need inside the "using" scope.

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It automatically calls the StreamReader.Dispose() method for you. If you choose not to use the using keyword, you end up with an open stream after you run your code block. This is beneficial if you want to reserve a file (etc) for continued use, but could be bad practice if you do are not going to manually dispose of it when finished.

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The using provides a convenient syntax that ensures the correct use of IDisposable objects. It is compiled into:

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path);
try 
{
    while (sr.Peek() >= 0) 
        Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
} finally
{
    sr.Dispose();
}

As documented on MSDN

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