Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a piece of code in C++ and then decided to change it to object-orientated and all my functions other than my qsort work. I have looked up it is to do with overloading the operators but I cannot figure out how to do this. Could anyone please help?

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

class OpAmps {
private:
    char Name[20]; 
    unsigned int PinCount; 
    double SlewRate; 
public:
    void Enter(OpAmps&, unsigned long&);
    void Save(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    void Load(OpAmps*, unsigned long&);
    void Sort(OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    int SortName(const void*, const void*);
    int SortSlewRate(const void*, const void*);
    void Display(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);
};

#define DATABASE_MAX 10
#define DATABASE_FILENAME "database.txt"

int main()
{
    OpAmps OpAmp[DATABASE_MAX]; 
    OpAmps Menu;
    unsigned long database_length = 0; 
    char UserInput;
    while (1) {
        cout << endl;
        cout << "Op-amp database menu" << endl;
        cout << "--------------------" << endl;
        cout << "1. Enter a new op-amp into the database" << endl;
        cout << "2. Save the database to disk" << endl;
        cout << "3. Load the database from disk" << endl;
        cout << "4. Sort the database" << endl;
        cout << "5. Display the database" << endl;
        cout << "6. Exit from the program" << endl << endl;
        cout << "Enter your option: ";
        cin >> UserInput;
        cout << endl;
        switch(UserInput) {
            case '1':
            Menu.Enter(OpAmp[database_length], database_length);
            break;
            case '2':
            Menu.Save(OpAmp, database_length);
            break;
            case '3':
            Menu.Load(OpAmp, database_length);
            break;
            case '4':
            Menu.Sort(OpAmp, database_length);
            break;
            case '5':
            Menu.Display(OpAmp, database_length);
            break;
            case '6':
            return 0;
            default:
            cout << "Invalid entry" << endl << endl;
            break;
        }
    }
}

void OpAmps::Enter(OpAmps& Op, unsigned long& length)
{
    if (length == DATABASE_MAX) {
        cout << "The database is full" << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << "Add new data" << endl;
        cout << "------------" << endl;
        cout << "Enter op-amp name: ";
        cin >> Op.Name;
        cout << "Enter number of pins: ";
        cin >> Op.PinCount;
        cout << "Enter slew rate: ";
        cin >> Op.SlewRate;
        cout << endl;
        length++;
    }
}

void OpAmps::Save(const OpAmps* Op, unsigned long length)
{
    fstream output_file;
    output_file.open(DATABASE_FILENAME, ios::out);
    if(output_file.good()) {
        output_file << length << endl << endl;
        for (unsigned long i=0;i<length;i++) {
            output_file << Op[i].Name << endl;
            output_file << Op[i].PinCount << endl;
            output_file << Op[i].SlewRate << endl << endl;
        }
    }
    output_file.close();
}

void OpAmps::Load(OpAmps* Op, unsigned long& length)
{
    fstream input_file; 
    input_file.open(DATABASE_FILENAME, ios::in);
    if(input_file.good()) {
        input_file >> length;
        for (unsigned long i=0;i<length;i++) {
            input_file >> Op[i].Name;
            input_file >> Op[i].PinCount;
            input_file >> Op[i].SlewRate;
        }
    }
    input_file.close();
}

void OpAmps::Sort(OpAmps* Op, unsigned long length)
{
    char UserInput;
    cout << endl;
    cout << "Sorting options" << endl;
    cout << "---------------" << endl;
    cout << "1. To sort by name" << endl;
    cout << "2. To sort by slew rate" << endl;
    cout << "3. No sorting" << endl << endl;
    cout << "Enter your option: ";
    cin >> UserInput;
    cout << endl;
    switch(UserInput) {
        case '1':
        cout<<"sortName"<<endl;
        qsort(Op,length,sizeof(OpAmps),SortName);
        break;
        case '2':
        cout<<"sortslew"<<endl;
        qsort(Op,length,sizeof(OpAmps),SortSlewRate);
        break;
        case '3':
        return;
        default:
        cout << "Invalid entry" << endl << endl;
        break;
    }
}

int SortName(const void *First, const void* Second)
{
    return strcmp(((OpAmps *) First)->Name, ((OpAmps *) Second)->Name);
}

int SortSlewRate (const void *First, const void* Second)
{
    return (int) ((((OpAmps *) First)->SlewRate > ((OpAmps *) Second)->SlewRate)? 1 : -1);
}

void OpAmps::Display(const OpAmps* Op, unsigned long length)
{
    if (length == 0) {
        cout << "No elements in the database" << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << endl;
        for (unsigned long i=0;i<length;i++) {
            cout << "Name: " << Op[i].Name <<endl;
            cout << "Number of Pins: " << Op[i].PinCount << endl;
            cout << "Slew Rate: " << Op[i].SlewRate << endl;
            cout << endl;
        }
    }
}

Cheers guy :D xx

share|improve this question
3  
Please, please, please indent your code. –  Carl Norum Feb 1 '13 at 0:01
10  
Please, please, please use std::sort instead of qsort. It will almost certainly perform better and it will work with all regular types. –  James McNellis Feb 1 '13 at 0:04
3  
qsort is a C function; it doesn't speak operator overloading. In what way does the code "not work"? Fail to compile? Produce wrong output? What is the expected output? –  Billy ONeal Feb 1 '13 at 0:04
    
Please don't mix C and C++ header! Use std::string instead of plain char *. –  Zeta Feb 1 '13 at 0:05
    
This code fails to compile with the qsort included but without it compiles and works correctly. The code is designed to bring up a menu to allow you to enter the name, pincount and slewrate of an opamp, then save, then load the values stored, sort them and display these results. I don't know how to use std::sort, could you give me an example of how this would work with my code at all?? –  Nicole Leanne Batchelor Feb 1 '13 at 0:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your problem in this case is that you've defined different kinds functions both with the same names. You've done this to both SortName and SortSlewRate.

One definition says "SortName" and "SortSlewRate" a member functions of the OpAmps class, however, in your code SortName and SortSlewRate are global functions.

qsort is a C function and requires function pointer not a member function pointer.

Since your functions are intended to be global functions, but access private members of the OpAmps class, you should put the 'friend' keyword in front of them.

Try changing your declarations to this...

class OpAmps {
private:
    char Name[20]; 
    unsigned int PinCount; 
    double SlewRate; 
public:
    void Enter(OpAmps&, unsigned long&);
    void Save(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    void Load(OpAmps*, unsigned long&);
    void Sort(OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    void Display(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);

    friend int SortName(const void*, const void*);
    friend int SortSlewRate(const void*, const void*);
};

All that said, you'd be better off using std::sort rather than qsort, you'll get the advantage of type-safety, and in some situations, even higher performance due to optimizations the compiler can make for you.

Your definitions would look like this

class OpAmps {
private:
    char Name[20]; 
    unsigned int PinCount; 
    double SlewRate; 
public:
    void Enter(OpAmps&, unsigned long&);
    void Save(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    void Load(OpAmps*, unsigned long&);
    void Sort(OpAmps*, unsigned long);
    void Display(const OpAmps*, unsigned long);

    friend bool SortName(const OpAmps &, const OpAmps &);
    friend bool SortSlewRate(const OpAmps &, const OpAmps &);
};

you would use "sort" like this...

    sort(Op, Op + length,SortName);

and

    sort(Op,Op + length,SortSlewRate);

Note, the sorting is a little different, the functions return true (less than) or false (equal or greather than) instead of -1 (less than), 0 (equal), -1 (greather than), and they aren't passed pointers, they're passed references.

You would define them like this.

bool SortName(const OpAmps &First, const OpAmps &Second)
{
    return strcmp(First.Name, Second.Name) < 0;
}

bool SortSlewRate (const OpAmps &First, const OpAmps &Second)
{
    return First.SlewRate < Second.SlewRate;
}

Finally, to go even more C++ like, you can switch your

char Name[20];

to

string Name;

This would simplify your SortName function and provide safety against nasty buffer overflows bugs.

bool SortName(const OpAmps &First, const OpAmps &Second)
{
    return First.Name < Second.Name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is great thank you, the only issue i am having now are on compiling i have this error: 'sort' : is not a member of 'std' and 'sort': identifier not found So I changed std to my class OpAmps and sort to my Sort but it comes up with this: 'OpAmps::Sort' : function does not take 3 arguments on each of the sort and this means it isn't doing the sort on the data. Any help? –  Nicole Leanne Batchelor Feb 1 '13 at 0:37
    
@NicoleLeanneBatchelor make sure you #include <algorithm> which defines std::sort, similarly #include <string> for std::string –  MerickOWA Feb 1 '13 at 0:40
    
amazing thank you !!! –  Nicole Leanne Batchelor Feb 1 '13 at 0:44
    
Sorry, one last thing - with string Name; how can i restrict it to 20 characters long? –  Nicole Leanne Batchelor Feb 1 '13 at 0:46
    
@NicoleLeanneBatchelor string is unrestricted, if you want to restrict it to 20 characters, you have to decide what you might do if you happen to read out a string which is more than 20 characters. If you just want to trim it to 20 characters, you can easily do something like Name = Name.substr(0,20) –  MerickOWA Feb 1 '13 at 1:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.