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I understand that to avoid output intermixing access to cout and cerr by multiple threads must be synchronized. In a program that uses both cout and cerr, is it sufficient to lock them separately? or is it still unsafe to write to cout and cerr simultaneously?

Edit clarification: I understand that cout and cerr are "Thread Safe" in C++11. My question is whether or not a write to cout and a write to cerr by different threads simultaneously can interfere with each other (resulting in interleaved input and such) in the way that two writes to cout can.

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1  
It's never "unsafe". You may just not get what you expect. –  Kerrek SB Feb 1 '13 at 0:17
    
I guess to clarify then. Is there a difference in behavior between using one global lock for writes to both cout and cerr vs a separate lock for each? –  zaphoyd Feb 1 '13 at 0:22
1  
you can use different locks. they don't depend on each other. –  thang Feb 1 '13 at 0:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you execute this function:

void f() {
    std::cout << "Hello, " << "world!\n";
}

from multiple threads you'll get a more-or-less random interleaving of the two strings, "Hello, " and "world\n". That's because there are two function calls, just as if you had written the code like this:

void f() {
    std::cout << "Hello, ";
    std::cout << "world!\n";
}

To prevent that interleaving, you have to add a lock:

std::mutex mtx;
void f() {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mtx);
    std::cout << "Hello, " << "world!\n";
}

That is, the problem of interleaving has nothing to do with cout. It's about the code that uses it: there are two separate function calls inserting text, so unless you prevent multiple threads from executing the same code at the same time, there's a potential for a thread switch between the function calls, which is what gives you the interleaving.

Note that a mutex does not prevent thread switches. In the preceding code snippet, it prevents executing the contents of f() simultaneously from two threads; one of the threads has to wait until the other finishes.

If you're also writing to cerr, you have the same issue, and you'll get interleaved output unless you ensure that you never have two threads making these inserter function calls at the same time, and that means that both functions must use the same mutex:

std::mutex mtx;
void f() {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mtx);
    std::cout << "Hello, " << "world!\n";
}

void g() {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mtx);
    std::cerr << "Hello, " << "world!\n";
}
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It should be noted that if the OS directs both cout and cerr to the same source (like... the console), then the text will be interleaved, unless they share the same mutex. –  Mooing Duck Nov 12 '13 at 21:05

In C++11, unlike in C++03, the insertion to and extraction from global stream objects (cout, cin, cerr, and clog) are thread-safe. There is no need to provide manual synchronization. It is possible, however, that characters inserted by different threads will interleave unpredictably while being output; similarly, when multiple threads are reading from the standard input, it is unpredictable which thread will read which token.

Thread-safety of the global stream objects is active by default, but it can be turned off by invoking the sync_with_stdio member function of the stream object and passing false as an argument. In that case, you would have to handle the synchronization manually.

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It may be unsafe to write to cout and cerr simultaneously ! It depends on wheter cout is tied to cerr or not. See std::ios::tie.

"The tied stream is an output stream object which is flushed before each i/o operation in this stream object."

This means, that cout.flush() may get called unintentionally by the thread which writes to cerr. I spent some time to figure out, that this was the reason for randomly missing line endings in cout's output in one of my projects :(

With C++98 cout should not be tied to cerr. But despite the standard it is tied when using MSVC 2008 (my experience). When using the following code everything works well.

std::ostream *cerr_tied_to = cerr.tie();
if (cerr_tied_to) {
    if (cerr_tied_to == &cout) {
        cerr << "DBG: cerr is tied to cout ! -- untying ..." << endl;
        cerr.tie(0);
    }
}

See also: why cerr flushes the buffer of cout

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