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I just saw this meta tag in the wild and was wondering it does and why it's used?

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge,chrome=1" >

Reading the documentation on About.com, it says:

"IE=edge" tells Internet Explorer to use the highest mode available to that version of IE. Internet Explorer 8 can support up to IE8 modes, IE9 can support IE9 modes and so on.

But what about the chrome=1 tag?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Its for Google's Chrome Frame browser add-on.

ChromeFrame can be installed on various versions of IE (especially handy for older versions that don't play nicely with modern web features). It essentially runs the chrome browser inside of IE.

In the case of the meta tag, IE should run in standards mode (most current edition "Edge") - and activate chrome frames if it exists.

I usually do some conditional browser stuff for older versions of IE, allowing the user to install the add-on as an option.

Moar here : chrome frame API

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I'd like to point out that MSDN documentation also states that you should only use IE=edge in testing environments only. –  Robbiegod May 29 '13 at 18:01
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and that Chrome Frame will be deprecated as of January 2014 –  Oskar Rough Aug 1 '13 at 8:08
    
Interesting. Hadn't read that. Well - its probably fine. It was a nice bandaid, though. –  Bosworth99 Aug 1 '13 at 15:01
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For info, chrome frame is now discontinued. This line may no longer be relevant for new projects. –  Offirmo Jul 18 at 8:34

Also, starting in IE11 "edge" mode, which used to be experimental, is now the "preferred" mode - see Compatibility changes in IE11 Preview

Additionally, "document modes" are generally being deprecated in IE11 all together, so you should probably try to stop depending on them.

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protected by Robert Longson Jul 12 at 17:16

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