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I'm doing the following to get time in "Day Month Day Year" format.

struct tm *example= localtime(&t);
strftime(buf,sizeof(buf),"%a %b %d %Y",example);
strncpy(time_buffer,buffer,sizeof(time_buffer))   ;

But if date is single digit,such as 9 it is displayed as 9. I'd like to print it as 09. Any idea how that can be done?

share|improve this question

The manpage for strftime says:

%d     The day of the month as a decimal number (range 01 to 31).

Which seems like what you want.

// compile with: gcc -o ex1 -Wall ex1.c
#include "stdio.h"
#include "sys/time.h"
#include "time.h"

int main (const int argc, const char ** argv ) {
  time_t curr_time;
  char buff[1024];
  // time(&curr_time);
  curr_time = 1359684105; // Thu Jan 31 2013
  struct tm *now = localtime(&curr_time);
  strftime(buff, sizeof(buff),  "%a %b %d %Y", now);
  printf("time: %ld\n", curr_time);
  printf("time: %s\n", buff);

  curr_time += 24 * 60 * 60; // Fri Feb 01 2013
  now = localtime(&curr_time);
  strftime(buff, sizeof(buff),  "%a %b %d %Y", now);
  printf("time: %ld\n", curr_time);
  printf("time: %s\n", buff);
  return 0;
}

That produces:

time: 1359684105
time: Thu Jan 31 2013
time: 1359770505
time: Fri Feb 01 2013

Which looks like what you're after. If you want to drop the leading zero, you can use %e:

   %e     Like %d, the day of the month as a decimal number, but a leading zero is replaced by a space. (SU)

Author reported that %d doesn't adhere to the manpage on solaris, here's an alternate solution that uses sprintf directly:

// compile with: gcc -o ex1 -Wall ex1.c
#include "stdio.h"
#include "sys/time.h"
#include "time.h"

int main (const int argc, const char ** argv ) {
  time_t curr_time;
  char buff[1024], daynamebuff[8], monbuff[8], daynumbuff[3], yearbuff[8];

  // time(&curr_time);
  curr_time = 1359684105; // Thu Jan 31 2013
  curr_time += 24 * 60 * 60; // Fri Feb 01 2013
  struct tm *now = localtime(&curr_time);

  strftime(daynamebuff, sizeof(daynamebuff), "%a", now);
  strftime(monbuff,     sizeof(monbuff), "%b", now);
  strftime(daynumbuff,  sizeof(daynumbuff), "%e", now);
  strftime(yearbuff,    sizeof(yearbuff), "%Y", now);

  sprintf(buff, "%s %s %02d %s", daynamebuff, monbuff, now->tm_mday, yearbuff);
  printf("%s\n", buff);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh Yeah, I did check that out in the man page. Now that I digged in more, I found out that the piece of I code developed works fine on Ubuntu machine but it fails (i.e it prints 9 instead of 09) in solaris machine. – Jw123 Feb 1 '13 at 2:21
    
Thank you, Kyle. That helped. – Jw123 Feb 1 '13 at 3:52

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