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Lets say in my main method, I declare a const int array pointer pointing to an array created on the heap. I then want to initialize it's values (using the memory address) in a constructor TryInitialize() and then print them out. This is not working and I'm wondering what I'm doing wrong? Thanks!

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "part_one.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

string createTable(unsigned int* acc, double* bal, int n) {
    string s;
    char buf[50];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            sprintf_s(buf,"%7u\t%10.2f\n",acc[i], bal[i]);
            s += string(buf);
    }

    return s;
}



int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    const int *tempInt = new const int[4];
    TryInitialize(tempInt);
    std::cout << tempInt[1] << endl;

    system("pause");

    return 0;
}

And here is my code for my constructor:

#include "part_one.h"


TryInitialize::TryInitialize(void) {

}

TryInitialize::TryInitialize(int constInt[]) {
    constInt[0] = 8;
    constInt[1] = 0;
    constInt[2] = 0;
    constInt[3] = 8;
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean "not initialize it until later"? Do you plan on having a user input it? How do you plan to initialize it? If you plan on having the user input it via std::cin then this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/12279601/… –  Rapptz Feb 1 '13 at 1:15
2  
You shouldn't. That is the point of const. –  Csq Feb 1 '13 at 1:15
2  
Where is your class? Having a constructor modify its parameters is a terrible idea (so terrible that the only standard library class to do so got replaced). It's supposed to initialize members of the new object, not have unrelated side-effects. –  Ben Voigt Feb 1 '13 at 1:22
    
I know, but that is my goal I'm trying to see if that is even possible. Pseudo idea: Main method- const int x; NewClass(x) constructor- initialize x; sys print x val; –  Taylor White Feb 1 '13 at 1:29
1  
@TaylorWhite, while there are useful C++ idioms where an object changes its parameter (for instance, aquire a lock and free it automatically in the destructor), the parameter isn't const. –  StoryTeller Feb 1 '13 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

You declare the pointer as const int*. The const modifier menas you cannot change the array values.

Either remove the const, or create an initializer method for it that can allocate the array and return it (unlike a constructor).

const int* init_my_array()
{
  int * ret = new int[4];
  ret [0] = 8;
  ret [1] = 0;
  ret [2] = 0;
  ret [3] = 8;
  return ret;
}
...
const int *tempInt = init_my_array();
share|improve this answer

You should not change a const value.

For what you trying to accomplish I'd recommend declaring a non-const pointer and a const pointer and assigning the non-const one to the const one after the initialization:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    const int *tempTempInt = new int[4];
    TryInitialize(tempInt);
    const int* const tempInt = tempTempInt;
    std::cout << tempInt[1] << endl; //this is now constant.

    system("pause");

    return 0;
}

Also pay attention where you put the const in the pointer declaration:

const int* const tempInt = tempTempInt;

In the declaration above the second const means that you cannot change the pointer; the first const means that you cannot change the pointed value(s).

share|improve this answer
1  
Rephrase your last sentence, right now it's unclear and probably wrong. –  Ben Voigt Feb 1 '13 at 1:23
    
Is there any way to not do it that way? I understand the purpose of constant, but I'm trying to see if I can get around it. For instance lets say I pass by reference the memory address, then set the values in another class. Thanks for the response by the way! –  Taylor White Feb 1 '13 at 1:26
    
@BenVoigt Thanks, it had a typo as well –  Csq Feb 1 '13 at 1:26
1  
@user2031046 This is C++. Everything has a workaround. (That is why I began the answer with should not and not cannot.) But why use hacks when you can write good code instead? –  Csq Feb 1 '13 at 1:29
    
I'm just trying to see what I can get away with :) –  Taylor White Feb 1 '13 at 1:32

You don't. Why? Because if it's const, then it can't be changed once the object has been constructed. Note: Even setting it is effectively changing its value from its uninitialized value, which goes against the definition of const to begin with.

share|improve this answer
    
This. Succinct, and to the point. How do I change const? You don't. –  mikeTheLiar Feb 1 '13 at 3:24

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