Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im writing embedded firmware, and find it sometimes hard to decide when I need volatile or not.

When I have a function that waits for some boolean flag to be changed by an interrupt, it's obvious that the flag needs to be volatile, because else the function would wait forever, since the compiler doesn't realise the value can be changed by the interrupt.

But when I have a short function that just checks a flag in the first line, I would expect the flag doesnt need to be volatile, because its value will be read every time I enter the function? So when an interrupt modifies its value between the first time I call the function, and the second time, I will get the fresh value. Or is it not guaranteed that every time I enter the function all caching registers are cleared?

share|improve this question
    
when in doubt, disassemble and see what the compiler did. doesnt mean it always will or wont if you change any of the code, have to re-check every time you compile and/or just make it volatile. –  dwelch Feb 1 '13 at 4:00
    
If volatile is too inefficient consider memory barriers. –  starblue Feb 2 '13 at 16:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You would still need to mark your variable volatile: since the optimizer is free to inline your functions, especially the short ones, calling your function in a loop without a volatile mark for accessing hardware-modified memory would place you in danger of not reading the memory after the initial iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
But when I would mark my function as 'not-inlineable' is it guaranteed by C that it gets a fresh copy? –  Muis Feb 1 '13 at 1:45
    
@Joshua I doubt that there is a guarantee like that in the standard, yet I cannot think of a way around it: if the function is not inlinable and there is a reference of an external variable, loading of the value needs to happen somehow, so there will be a read. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 1 '13 at 1:51
    
Maybe the compiler would recycle some register/stack parts when it notices the function is called within a loop, but I'm happy their not that smart ;) –  Muis Feb 1 '13 at 1:58
    
Whether the function gets inlined or not doesn't matter, because the "missing volatile" bug is more fundamental than that: the optimizer may change the meaning of the whole code. So this doesn't answer the question. –  Lundin Feb 1 '13 at 7:59
1  
@Lundin Why, it most certainly does answer the "may I skip volatile" question negatively, giving a perfectly good reason (inlining) for it. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 1 '13 at 11:19

...because its value will be read every time I enter the function?

No, there is no guarantee for this. The problem with the "lack of volatile bug" is that the compiler's optimizer, unaware of that a certain variable can get changed from an external source, changes the whole meaning of the code.

So if you have this:

static int x=0;

int func (void)
{
  if(x == 0)
  {
    return 1;
  }
  else
  {
    return 0;
  }
}

interrupt void isr (void)
{
  x = SOMETHING;
}

Then the compiler will ponder: "Hmm, x is never modified anywhere, since "isr" is never called from the program. So x is always 0, I'll optimize the code to this:"

int func (void)
{
  return 1;
}

And then, perhaps, it will inline the whole function. Whether that happens or not is of no consequence, since the meaning of the code is already destroyed in the previous optimization step.

Any variable shared with an interrupt (or a thread, or DMA, or a hardware register, or a callback function) must be declared as volatile, always.

share|improve this answer

ANY access to a hardware register is best to be marked volatile. The compiler doesn't know that it will be changed via interrupt or DMA from the hardware and the compiler can and will assume it doesn't so it can and will cache certain values.

Essentially if it's hardware mapped or can be changed via interrupt (from hardware) mark it volatile.

share|improve this answer

In addition to marking the variable volatile to force a load (as @dasblinkenlight suggests), you should also take steps to ensure that the variable is read (and written) atomically. On some platforms for certain sized objects (like 32-bit values on recent x86 processors), this happens automatically. In general, you might need to put a synchronization lock around the variable, like a mutex or a semaphore. This is relatively easy to do when the asynchronous code is a thread. I'm not sure what to do when there is a true interrupt involved, as some synchronization techniques might not be possible. Your platform documentation should provide some insight here.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a 32-bit ARM processor, and in the documentation I read that all 32-bit acceses are automaticly atomic. So I'm in luck, because I don't know how I would implement mutexes on this simple MCU. –  Muis Feb 1 '13 at 1:54
    
Cool. Sounds like you're all set. Good luck. –  Randall Cook Feb 1 '13 at 2:00
    
Mutexes, and other OS calls that can block, cannot be used in interrupt handlers. If an RTOS is being used, the usual way of notifying a waiting thread from an interupt handler is by a semaphore signal, not some volatile flag. –  Martin James Feb 1 '13 at 11:23

All shared memory should be declared volatile.

You may or may not be right that your particular compiler will not optimise out a read in a particular example, but in that case the volatile keyword adds zero overhead (i.e. there is no overhead in specifying an explicit read where it was going to happen in any case), so why risk undefined or non-portable behaviour?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.