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What is the best way to calculate hash code based on values of these string in one pass?

With good I mean that it needs to be:

1 - fast: I need to get hash code for huge list (10^3..10^8 items) of short strings.

2 - identify the whole list of data so many list with maybe only couple of different strings must have different hash codes

How to do it in Java?

Maybe there is a way to use existing string hash code, but how to merge many hash codes calculated for separate strings?

Thank you.

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2  
What is "good"? –  Ryan Stewart Feb 1 '13 at 1:49
1  
What do you want the hash code for? Do you just want one hash, or one for each string? –  Hot Licks Feb 1 '13 at 1:53
    
Do you want hash code values like java already has hashCode() method on String which returns an int or, do you want hash values like MD5 digest? –  Bimalesh Jha Feb 1 '13 at 2:03
    
Why not use the inbuilt hashCode() method? List implementations that extends AbstractList do count its value from the hash codes of its elements. –  Natix Feb 1 '13 at 2:06
    
Must the hash code be order-sensitive? Ie should the hash code for {"a", "b", "c"} be the same or different than the hash code for {"a", "c", "b"}? –  Bohemian Feb 1 '13 at 2:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

create a placeholder class for you strings and then use CRC32 class. its simple and fast:

import java.util.zip.CRC32;

public class HugeStringCollection {
    private Collection<String> strings;

    public HugeStringCollection(Collection<String> strings) {
        this.strings = strings;
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        CRC32 crc = new CRC32();
        for(String string : strings) {
            crc.update(string.getBytes())
        }

        return (int)( crc.getValue() );
    }
}

if the collection itself is immutable, you can compute the hash once and store it for lates reuse.

share|improve this answer
    
crc sounds fast, how good is it at representing the data? –  Bohdan Feb 1 '13 at 6:03
    
it has been widely used in file processing for years, e.g. in ZIP compression –  mantrid Feb 1 '13 at 7:42
    
@mantrid how do you convert this to work for an arraylist of Characters? as I guess we don't have getBytes for character!? –  Mona Jalal Aug 3 at 20:32

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