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This is what I need to do:

int lg(int v)
{
    int r = 0;
    while (v >>= 1) // unroll for more speed...
    {
        r++;
    }
}

I found the above solution at: http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLog

This works, butI need to do it without loops, control structures, or constants bigger than 0xFF (255), which has proven to be very hard for me to find. I've been trying to figure something out using conditionals in the form

( x ? y : z ) = (((~(!!x) + 1)) & y) | ((~(~(!!x) + 1)) & z)

but I can't get it to work. Thanks for your time.

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I've vaguely recalling a way to find the least significant bit, but not the most significant. But if you have to use conditionals you're probably not doing it right. –  Hot Licks Feb 1 '13 at 2:02
    
possible duplicate of Compute fast log base 2 ceiling –  Hans Passant Feb 1 '13 at 2:08
2  
Isn't the operator ? : a control structure? –  ring0 Feb 1 '13 at 2:11
    
The second solution in your link already does what you're looking for (except it uses 0xFFFF as a constant, but that's very easy to get rid of). –  us2012 Feb 1 '13 at 2:12
    
Is recursion allowed? –  Mats Petersson Feb 1 '13 at 2:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Without any control structure, not even the ?: operator, you can simulate your own algo

int r = 0;

x >>= 1;
r += (x != 0);
x >>= 1;
r += (x != 0);
...

provided that, in C,

  • x is assumed to be positive (otherwise having int x=-1; for instance x >>= 1 n times is always != 0
  • a condition like x != 0 returns 0 (false) or 1 (*true)
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!= is not allowed, but I got around it by using the substitution I wrote above for x ? 1 : 0 , so I have r += (((~(!!x) + 1)) & 1) | ((~(~(!!x) + 1)) & 0) . Your answer did the trick :-) –  Tagg Ridler Feb 1 '13 at 3:51

That sounds like a homework. Well, if you can't use control structures, a good alternative is to precalculate what you can: divide and conquer. Solve for a smaller part (one byte, one nibble, your choice), and apply to the parts of your integer.

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