Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a regular expression for IPv6 addresses as given below

IPV4ADDRESS      [ \t]*(([[:digit:]]{1,3}"."){3}([[:digit:]]{1,3}))[ \t]*
x4               ([[:xdigit:]]{1,4})
xseq             ({x4}(:{x4}){0,7})
xpart            ({xseq}|({xseq}::({xseq}?))|::{xseq})
IPV6ADDRESS      [ \t]*({xpart}(":"{IPV4ADDRESS})?)[ \t]*

It is correctly all formats of IPv6 addresses including

1) non-compressed IPv6 addresses
2) compressed IPv6 addresses
3) IPv6 addresses in legacy formats.(supporting IPv4)

Ideal examples of IPv6 addresses in legacy formats would be

2001:1234::3210:5.6.7.8

     OR
2001:1234:1234:5432:4578:5678:5.6.7.8

As you can see above there are 10 groups separated by either `":" or ".".`

As opposed to 8 groups in normal IPv6 addresses.This is because the last 4 groups that are separated by `"." should be compressed into least significant 32-bits of the IPv6 addresses.Hence we need 10 groups to satisfy 128 bits.

However If I use the following address format

   2001:1234:4563:3210:5.6.7.8

Here each group separated by ":" represents 16-bits.the last four groups separted by "." represents 8 bits.Total number of bits is 64 + 32 = 96 bits.32 bits are missing

The regular expression is accepting it as a valid IPv6 address format.I am unable to figure out how to fix the regular expression to discard such values.Any help is highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you explain what's wrong with the negative example provided? –  Sina Iravanian Feb 1 '13 at 2:34
    
it is explained above the example.each group separated by ":" represents 16-bits.the last four groups separted by "." represents 8 bits.Total number of bits is 64 + 32 = 96 bits.32 bits are missing. –  liv2hak Feb 1 '13 at 2:44
1  
Well, it also accepts such nonsense as ::0:999.999.999.999. –  nneonneo Feb 1 '13 at 3:49
    
I have code inside to check if the ipv4 part is < 255. –  liv2hak Feb 1 '13 at 4:07
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's the grammar for IPv6 addresses as given in RFC 3986 and subsequently affirmed in RFC 5954:

 IPv6address   =                             6( h16 ":" ) ls32
                /                       "::" 5( h16 ":" ) ls32
                / [               h16 ] "::" 4( h16 ":" ) ls32
                / [ *1( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 3( h16 ":" ) ls32
                / [ *2( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::" 2( h16 ":" ) ls32
                / [ *3( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"    h16 ":"   ls32
                / [ *4( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              ls32
                / [ *5( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"              h16
                / [ *6( h16 ":" ) h16 ] "::"

 h16           = 1*4HEXDIG
 ls32          = ( h16 ":" h16 ) / IPv4address
 IPv4address   = dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet "." dec-octet
 dec-octet     = DIGIT                 ; 0-9
                / %x31-39 DIGIT         ; 10-99
                / "1" 2DIGIT            ; 100-199
                / "2" %x30-34 DIGIT     ; 200-249
                / "25" %x30-35          ; 250-255

Using this, we can build a standards-compliant regular expression for IPv6 addresses.

dec_octet      ([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])
ipv4address    ({dec_octet}"."){3}{dec_octet}
h16            ([[:xdigit:]]{1,4})
ls32           ({h16}:{h16}|{ipv4address})
ipv6address    (({h16}:){6}{ls32}|::({h16}:){5}{ls32}|({h16})?::({h16}:){4}{ls32}|(({h16}:){0,1}{h16})?::({h16}:){3}{ls32}|(({h16}:){0,2}{h16})?::({h16}:){2}{ls32}|(({h16}:){0,3}{h16})?::{h16}:{ls32}|(({h16}:){0,4}{h16})?::{ls32}|(({h16}:){0,5}{h16})?::{h16}|(({h16}:){0,6}{h16})?::)

Disclaimer: untested.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.