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I have a Model that looks like:

var Playlist = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: function() {
        return {
            id: null,
            items: new PlaylistItems()
        };
    }
});

where PlaylistItems is a Backbone.Collection.

After I create a Playlist object, I call save.

playlist.save({}, {
    success: function(model, response, options) {
        console.log("model:", model, response, options);
    },
    error: function (error) {
        console.error(error);
    }
});

In here, my model is a Backbone.Model object. However, its child, items, is of type Array and not Backbone.Collection.

This was unexpected behavior. Am I missing something? Or, do I need to manually pass my array into a new Backbone.Collection and initialize this myself?

share|improve this question
    
Backbone by default doesn't support saving/sync'ing of Collections, so what's likely happening is that after the model makes it's roundtrip the resultant JSON array is used as is. Collections are intended to be collections of Models (intended for managing their own persistence). If PlaylistItems are children of an aggregate root then you likely shouldn't be using a Collection to begin with. –  Matt Whipple Feb 1 '13 at 3:06
    
I am calling Save on a Model not on a Collection. I don't think it's unreasonable to have a child Collection of a Model load during a save... are you saying that Backbone considers that bad practice? If so, do you know why? This seems like a common 1 to 0+. –  Sean Anderson Feb 1 '13 at 3:17
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It kind of depends on what your server is expecting and what it responds with. Backbone does not know that the attribute items is a Backbone Collection and what to do with it. Something like this might work, depending on your server.

 var Playlist = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: function() {
        return {
            id: null,
            items: new PlaylistItems()
        };
    },
    toJSON: function(){
        // return the json your server is expecting.
        var json = Backbone.Model.prototype.toJSON.call(this);
        json.items = this.get('items').toJSON();
        return json;
    },
    parse: function(data){
        // data comes from your server response
        // so here you need to call something like:
        this.get('items').reset(data.items);
        // then remove items from data: 
        delete data.items;
        return data;
    }

});
share|improve this answer
    
How come you delete data.items before returning? Wouldn't it make more sense to modify data.items such that it is a Backbone.Collection? –  Sean Anderson Feb 1 '13 at 3:15
    
The object you return from parse gets set() on the model, so if you created a new Collection and return that, the model would have a new collection instance for items. If you had hooked up a 'reset' event or anything else to the previous Collection instance, it would no longer work. Calling reset() with the new json keeps the same instance, so a 'reset' event handler would still get hit. –  Paul Hoenecke Feb 1 '13 at 3:19
    
Would saying data.items = new PlaylistItems(data.items); and then returning data achieve the same result? Or something different? If different, could you explain why? I think I understand but I want to make sure.. –  Sean Anderson Feb 1 '13 at 3:22
    
Now, if you have access to change the REST API you could and maybe should do what @Matt suggested and create endpoints for the individual playlist items. Then when you add a playlist item you would use playlistItems.create() with the new item's json passed in. –  Paul Hoenecke Feb 1 '13 at 3:23
    
data.items = new PlaylistItems(data.items) creates a new instance. It would break if you had some event handler somewhere else in your code like playlist.get('items').on('reset', doSomethingOnReset) because this was hooking up to the instance you replaced. –  Paul Hoenecke Feb 1 '13 at 3:26
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