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In TypeScript I can declare a parameter of a function as a type Function. Is there a "type-safe" way of doing this that I am missing? For example, consider this:

class Foo {
    save(callback: Function) : void {
        //Do the save
        var result : number = 42; //We get a number from the save operation
        //Can I at compile-time ensure the callback accepts a single parameter of type number somehow?
        callback(result);
    }
}

var foo = new Foo();
var callback = (result: string) : void => {
    alert(result);
}
foo.save(callback);

The save callback is not type safe, I am giving it a callback function where the function's parameter is a string but I am passing it a number, and compiles with no errors. Can I make the result parameter in save a type-safe function?

tl;dr version: is there an equivalent of a .NET delegate in TypeScript?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Sure:

class Foo {
    save(callback: (n: number) => any) : void {
        callback(42);
    }
}
var foo = new Foo();

var strCallback = (result: string) : void => {
    alert(result);
}
var numCallback = (result: number) : void => {
    alert(result.toString());
}

foo.save(strCallback); // not OK
foo.save(numCallback); // OK

If you want, you can make an interface to encapsulate this:

interface NumberCallback {
    (n: number): any;   
}

class Foo {
    // Equivalent
    save(callback: NumberCallback) : void {
        callback(42);
    }
}
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Huh, that seems so obvious now. Thanks! –  vcsjones Feb 1 '13 at 14:26

Here are TypeScript equivalents of some common .NET delegates:

interface Action<T>
{
    (item: T): void;
}

interface Func<T,TResult>
{
    (item: T): TResult;
}
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