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I'm trying to figure out how to iterate through an array in Ruby and perform actions based upon the values (and figure out how to use yield. Below is the code I have so far, however this is not working. Can someone help point me in the right direction?

each_odd("Odd")

def each_odd
  array = [1, 2, 3, 4]
  array.map {|x| 
   if (x % 2 != 0) do x = yield 
   else x = "Even"
   end}
end

I am expecting this to return the following array: ["Odd", "Even", "Odd", "Even"]

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3  
"this is not working" is about as helpful as "xyzzyplughtwisty" in terms of indicating the problem :-) Every problem report should have (1) a complete minimal sample exhibiting the problem, (2) the expected behaviour and (3) the actual behaviour. –  paxdiablo Feb 1 '13 at 3:04
    
That's about what I get for an error message. I get the code I wrote given back to me in the command line with a 'carrot' underneath the yield –  NealR Feb 1 '13 at 3:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To use yield you have to pass a block.

And you can use {} blocks

each_odd { 'Odd' } #=> ["Odd", "Even", "Odd", "Even"]

Or do .. end blocks

each_odd do
  'Odd'
end
#=> ["Odd", "Even", "Odd", "Even"]

And here is how to implement the method

def each_odd
  [1, 2, 3, 4].map do |x| 
    (x % 2 != 0) ? yield(x) : 'Even'
  end
end

When called yield it will evaluate what's inside the block and return it to the context, also you can pass parameters to the block like so:

yield(x)

and then you could do something like

each_odd { |num| "#{num} is Odd" } #=> ["1 is Odd", "Even", "3 is Odd", "Even"]
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I understand it is easier to not use yield, however I am trying to learn Ruby. Right now, specifically how to iterate through and array and use yield. –  NealR Feb 1 '13 at 3:15
    
Ok, I will give you the exemple with yield –  Ismael Abreu Feb 1 '13 at 3:15
    
Perfect, thank you very much! –  NealR Feb 1 '13 at 3:18
    
This is a really bad example if your intention is learning, but anyway, it's your education not mine. –  aromero Feb 1 '13 at 3:21
1  
@aromero true. But when at beginning it's good already to just understand a way that it runs and does what you expect. Even if it's really a dummy exercise. –  Ismael Abreu Feb 1 '13 at 3:26

There is no point in yielding in this case, simply use a map

[1,2,3,4].map{|x| x % 2 == 0 ? "Even" : "Odd" }
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I'm trying to use yield to transform the array from [1, 2, 3, 4] to ["Odd", "Even", "Odd", "Even"] –  NealR Feb 1 '13 at 3:11
    
Oh I see, I'll edit my answer. –  aromero Feb 1 '13 at 3:11
    
I understand it is easier to not use yield, however I am trying to learn how to Ruby. Right now, specifically how to iterate through and array and use yield. –  NealR Feb 1 '13 at 3:14
    
Try to formulate a good example for using yield then. How about recreating the map? You can try that, and then apply it to this example. –  aromero Feb 1 '13 at 3:16
1  
x % 2 == 0 could be replaced with just x.even?. –  Andrew Marshall Feb 1 '13 at 3:20

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