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Is there a slick way to merge multiple Lists into a single List using LINQ to effectively replicate this?

public class RGB
{
    public int Red { get; set; }
    public int Green { get; set; }
    public int Blue { get; set; }
    public RGB(int red, int green, int blue) { Red = red; Green = green; Blue = blue; }
}

public void myFunction()
{
    List<int> red = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x03, 0x06, 0x08, 0x09 };
    List<int> green = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x0a };
    List<int> blue = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x02, 0x03, 0x05, 0x09 };

    List<RGB> colors = new List<RGB>();

    colors.Add(new RGB(red[0], green[0], blue[0]));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[1], green[1], blue[1]));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[2], green[2], blue[2]));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[3], green[3], blue[3]));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[4], green[4], blue[4]));
}

Or, since the lists arrive separately, its more effective to merge them sequentially like the following.

public class RGB
{
    public int Red { get; set; }
    public int Green { get; set; }
    public int Blue { get; set; }

    public RGB(int red, int green, int blue) { Red = red; Green = green; Blue = blue; }
}

public void myFunction()
{
    List<int> red = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x03, 0x06, 0x08, 0x09 };

    List<RGB> colors = new List<RGB>();

    colors.Add(new RGB(red[0], 0, 0));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[1], 0, 0));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[2], 0, 0));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[3], 0, 0));
    colors.Add(new RGB(red[4], 0, 0));

    List<int> green = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x0a };

    colors[0].Green = green[0];
    colors[1].Green = green[1];
    colors[2].Green = green[2];
    colors[3].Green = green[3];
    colors[4].Green = green[4];

    List<int> blue = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x02, 0x03, 0x05, 0x09 };

    colors[0].Blue = blue[0];
    colors[1].Blue = blue[1];
    colors[2].Blue = blue[2];
    colors[3].Blue = blue[3];
    colors[4].Blue = blue[4];
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Create Items from 3 collections using Linq –  Pat Nov 21 '13 at 17:41
    
Similar, but different. The former is specific to memory performance and resource optimization. This was not a question about resources, the answers are not targeted at a specific performance metric, and provide a broad set of possibilities, unconstrained by performance factors. –  tlum Nov 25 '13 at 19:26
    
The other question is poorly written, and the answers aren't as good as the ones here, but it isn't specifically concerned with performance at all (the OP just mentioned that s/he was running out of memory), it's a straightforward and minimal question, and it's older, so therefore I see it as a "possible" duplicate. Either way, others should know that a similar question exists and have a link to it. –  Pat Nov 26 '13 at 23:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're essentially trying to zip up three collections. If only the LINQ Zip() method supported zipping up more than two simultaneously. But alas, it only supports only two at a time. But we can make it work:

var reds = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x03, 0x06, 0x08, 0x09 };
var greens = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x0a };
var blues = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x02, 0x03, 0x05, 0x09 };

var colors =
    reds.Zip(greens.Zip(blues, Tuple.Create),
        (red, tuple) => new RGB(red, tuple.Item1, tuple.Item2)
    )
    .ToList();

Of course it's not terribly painful to write up an extension method to do three (or more).

public static IEnumerable<TResult> Zip<TFirst, TSecond, TThird, TResult>(
    this IEnumerable<TFirst> first,
    IEnumerable<TSecond> second,
    IEnumerable<TThird> third,
    Func<TFirst, TSecond, TThird, TResult> resultSelector)
{
    using (var enum1 = first.GetEnumerator())
    using (var enum2 = second.GetEnumerator())
    using (var enum3 = third.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (enum1.MoveNext() && enum2.MoveNext() && enum3.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return resultSelector(
                enum1.Current,
                enum2.Current,
                enum3.Current);
        }
    }
}

This makes things a lot more nicer:

var colors =
    reds.Zip(greens, blues,
        (red, green, blue) => new RGB(red, green, blue)
    )
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 IMHO reds.Zip(greens.Zip(blues, (g, b) => new {g,b}), (r, gb) => new RGB(r, gb.g, gb.b)) would be more readable though. –  lc. Feb 1 '13 at 4:15
    
That'd work too and I'd agree, definitely more readable (though I'd write out the names personally). But this is enough to get my point across. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 1 '13 at 4:18
    
+1 for showing one more linq method Awesomeness –  Ravi Gadag Feb 1 '13 at 4:20
var colours = red.Select((t, i) => new RGB(t, green[i], blue[i])).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
The only problem with this solution is that it assumes the length of the red array. It will fail catastrophically if there are more reds than the others. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 1 '13 at 4:16
2  
@JeffMercado Same applies to the OP's solution #1, though. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 1 '13 at 4:17
    
Yes, care is very important to keep them in sync. Fortunately in this application you've already thrown exceptions if the lists are the wrong size and/or the checksum is wrong. Even if they are the same size the answer ends up terribly wrong even if they're not all in the correct order. Its never pretty trying to put together related, but distinctly separate objects. –  tlum Feb 1 '13 at 4:56

Yes - you can do it like this:

List<int> red = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x03, 0x06, 0x08, 0x09 };
List<int> green = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x0a };
List<int> blue = new List<int> { 0x00, 0x02, 0x03, 0x05, 0x09 };

List<RGB> colors = Enumerable
    .Range(0, red.Count)
    .Select(i => new RGB(red[i], green[i], blue[i]))
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer

You can use Aggregate with Zip to zip an arbitrary number of IEnumerables in one go.

Here's how you might do that with your example:

var colorLists = new List<int>[] { red, green, blue };
var rgbCount = red.Count;
var emptyTriples =
    Enumerable.Repeat<Func<List<int>>>(() => new List<int>(), rgbCount)
    .Select(makeList => makeList());

var rgbTriples = colorLists.Aggregate(
    emptyTriples,
    (partialTriples, channelValues) =>
        partialTriples.Zip(
            channelValues,
            (partialTriple, channelValue) =>
            {
                partialTriple.Add(channelValue);
                return partialTriple;
            }));

var rgbObjects = rgbTriples.Select(
    triple => new RGB(triple[0], triple[1], triple[2]));

Generally, relying on Zip as the underlying combiner avoids problems with varying input lengths.

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