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I've got an assignment to optimize a piece of C code (a language in which I'm rather n00bish) designed to simulate rotating pixels in an image:

void naive_rotate(int dim, pixel *src, pixel *dst) {
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < dim; i++)
        for (j = 0; j < dim; j++)
            dst[RIDX(dim-1-j, i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j, dim)];
}

Defs for pixel and RIDX are as follows:

typedef struct {
    unsigned short red;
    unsigned short green;
    unsigned short blue;
} pixel;

#define RIDX(i,j,n) ((i)*(n)+(j))

The instructions for the assignment contain the note, "Your task is to rewrite this code to make it run as fast as possible using techniques like code motion, loop unrolling and blocking."

I thought I had some ideas on how to approach this. However, my attempts at loop unrolling:

void rotate_unroll(int dim, pixel *src, pixel *dst) {
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < dim; j+=4) {
            dst[RIDX(dim-1-j, i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j, dim)];
            dst[RIDX(dim-1-(j+1), i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j+1, dim)];
            dst[RIDX(dim-1-(j+2), i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j+2, dim)];
            dst[RIDX(dim-1-(j+3), i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j+3, dim)];
        }
    }
}

and code motion (or at least reorganizing RIDX and moving around some of the calculations out of the inner loop):

void rotate_motion(int dim, pixel *src, pixel *dst) {
    int i, j;
    int dimsquared = dim * dim;
    for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) {
        int dst_temp = dimsquared - dim + i;
        int src_temp = i * dim;
        for (j = 0; j < dim; j++) {
            dst[dst_temp - (dim * j)] = src[src_temp + j];
        }
    }
}
//   dst[RIDX(dim-1-j, i, dim)] 
// = dst[(dim-1-j)dim + i] 
// = dst[(dim * dim) - dim - (dim)j + i]
//   src[RIDX(i, j, dim)]
// = src[(dim)i + j]

do not seem to be working; the timer packaged with the assignment claims that my solutions are not having any impact on the CPE of the program. I suspect I am probably approaching both methods incorrectly and would greatly appreciate any guidance in the right direction. (It's a homework assignment so I'm not asking for a complete solution, just some pointers.)

My other thought was to try to add an accumulator -- something along the lines of the following:

void rotate_acc(int dim, pixel *src, pixel *dst) {
    int i, j;
    pixel temp = dst;
    for (i = 0; i < dim; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < dim; j++) {
            temp[RIDX(dim-1-j, i, dim)] = src[RIDX(i, j, dim)];
        }
    }
    dst = temp;
}

But my syntax is very wrong there and I'm not sure how one would go about constructing a temporary version of the struct in question.

Any help is much appreciated. Thanks!

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3  
Note: you usually won't ever need to do this in the real-world. Most compilers know how to do this stuff better than you. However, it's useful to understand how this happens –  Earlz Feb 1 '13 at 4:11
    
When you compile it, make sure to disable all optimizations - don't let the compiler "outsmart" you :D Also, check out the generated "assembly" code. –  user166390 Feb 1 '13 at 4:25

2 Answers 2

You need to have a thorough understanding on pointers in C. Put it simply: pointers represent an address of where your data is stored in memory (pixel struct in your case).

In your code, the function rotate_acc takes a pixel pointer as argument: pixel *dst. At first you can be tempted to say pixel *tmp = dst, but keep in mind this is what is called shallow copy -- only the address are copied, not the data it's pointing at -- hence if you modify tmp by saying tmp->red = 0, it will modify the original data too

If you need a deep copy, you need to say pixel tmp = *dst

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1  
Is it code motion, loop unrolling and blocking ? –  ring0 Feb 1 '13 at 4:19
    
Hmm. I figured it was something along those lines. What is the syntax for accessing values in tmp and reassigning tmp back to dst? What I've got in my question right now is throwing errors. ("subscripted value is neither array nor pointer" and "incompatible types when assigning to type ‘struct pixel *’ from type ‘pixel’"). Thanks! –  rosalindwills Feb 1 '13 at 4:29

Try this:

void naive_rotate(int dim, pixel *src, pixel *dst) {
    int dimSq = dim * dim;
    int dstdIxStart = dimSq - dim;
    int endIdx = dimSq - 2 * dim - 2;
    int dstIdx = dimSq - dim;
    for (int i = 0; int < endIdx; ++i)
    {
       dst[dstIdx--] = src[i];
       if (0 == dstIdx)
       {
          dstdIxStart -= dim;
          dstIdx = dstdIxStart;
       }
    }
}

You will have to double check the maths, but I hope you get the idea.

It removes all the multiplications. Also as src is being accessed sequentially it is good for the cache.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for putting this together...could you possibly give a little bit of explanation on the intermediate steps you used to get to this result? According to the tests that were packaged with the assignment, the math isn't quite working out here and I'm not sure how you got from the initial function to this. Thanks :) –  rosalindwills Feb 1 '13 at 5:17

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