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I have a code to encrypt/decrypt data in C# and I want it to convert into Java. but also i have code for java but both c# and Java give different outputs....

plz help

following is the C# code

 public class DataEncryption
{

    public string StringEncode(string value, string key)
    {
        System.Security.Cryptography.MACTripleDES mac3des = new System.Security.Cryptography.MACTripleDES();
        System.Security.Cryptography.MD5CryptoServiceProvider md5 = new System.Security.Cryptography.MD5CryptoServiceProvider();

        mac3des.Key = md5.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key));




        return Convert.ToBase64String(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(value)) + '-' + Convert.ToBase64String(mac3des.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(value)));
    }



    public string StringDecode(string value, string key)
    {
        string dataValue = "";
        string calcHash = "";
        string storedHash = "";
        if ((value == null))
            return dataValue;

        System.Security.Cryptography.MACTripleDES mac3des = new System.Security.Cryptography.MACTripleDES();
        System.Security.Cryptography.MD5CryptoServiceProvider md5 = new System.Security.Cryptography.MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
        mac3des.Key = md5.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key));

        //   Try
        dataValue = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(value.Split('-')[0]));
        storedHash = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(value.Split('-')[1]));
        calcHash = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(mac3des.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(dataValue)));

        if (storedHash != calcHash)
        {
            //Data was corrupted
            throw new ArgumentException("Hash value does not match");
            //This error is immediately caught below
        }
        //Catch ex As Exception
        //    Throw New ArgumentException("Invalid TamperProofString")
        //End Try
        return dataValue;

    }

    public string BinaryDecode(byte[] value, string key)
    {
        string decodeVal = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(value);
        //decodeVal = decodeVal.Trim('\0');
        return StringDecode(decodeVal, key);
    }

    public byte[] BinaryEncode(string value, string key)
    {
        byte[] tmp = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(StringEncode(value, key));
        BinaryDecode(tmp, key);
        return tmp;
        //return Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(StringEncode(value, key));
    }
}

following is the Java code

class ZiggyTest2{


    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{  
        String text = "mathees";

        byte[] codedtext = new ZiggyTest2().encrypt(text);
        String s = new String(codedtext);
        byte[] codedtext1 = new ZiggyTest2().encrypt(s);
        String decodedtext = new ZiggyTest2().decrypt(codedtext);

        System.out.println(codedtext); // this is a byte array, you'll just see a reference to an array
        System.out.println(decodedtext); // This correctly shows "kyle boon"
        System.out.println(codedtext1);

    }

    public byte[] encrypt(String message) throws Exception {
        MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("md5");            


        byte[] digestOfPassword = md.digest("sanje"
                        .getBytes("utf-8"));
        byte[] keyBytes = Arrays.copyOf(digestOfPassword, 24);
        for (int j = 0, k = 16; j < 8;) {
                keyBytes[k++] = keyBytes[j++];
        }

        SecretKey key = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "DESede");
        IvParameterSpec iv = new IvParameterSpec(new byte[8]);
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("DESede/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, iv);

        byte[] plainTextBytes = message.getBytes("utf-8");
        byte[] cipherText = cipher.doFinal(plainTextBytes);
        // String encodedCipherText = new sun.misc.BASE64Encoder()
        // .encode(cipherText);

        return cipherText;
    }

    public String decrypt(byte[] message) throws Exception {
        MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("md5");
        byte[] digestOfPassword = md.digest("sanje"
                        .getBytes("utf-8"));
        byte[] keyBytes = Arrays.copyOf(digestOfPassword, 24);
        for (int j = 0, k = 16; j < 8;) {
                keyBytes[k++] = keyBytes[j++];
        }

        SecretKey key = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "DESede");
        IvParameterSpec iv = new IvParameterSpec(new byte[8]);
        Cipher decipher = Cipher.getInstance("DESede/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        decipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, iv);

        byte[] plainText = decipher.doFinal(message);

        return new String(plainText, "UTF-8");
    }
}
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closed as too localized by lc., Kirk Woll, Ravi Gadag, Julius, SWeko Feb 1 '13 at 10:50

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1 Answer 1

your two code samples are not anywhere close to the same. On first glance:

  1. the key generation is different. the C# code uses md5 to derive a key from the bytes directly using MD5CryptoServiceProvider, whereas java uses md5 then pads the remaining 8 bytes with zeros using array copy. (which is horrifying insecure). you should use a proper key derivation function like PBKDF2 to generate the 24-byte/192-bit key.

  2. the actual algorithms aren't the same. Your first example uses a MAC generator based on 3DES, whereas the java sample encrypts a message using 3DES. A MAC (Message Authentication Code) is a type of hash that is used to authenticate that a message hasn't been tampered with. It doesn't actually encrypt text.

Rather than copying and pasting random blocks of encryption code from the web, please take some time to read some books about cryptography (Cryptography Engineering is a great high level intro to cryptography in practice) so you will know what you're doing. Bad cryptography is almost worse than no cryptography at all, since you will have a false sense of security.

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