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Allow me to give some background. I have an abstract class, Foo.

class Foo {
public:
    virtual void bar() = 0;
}

I have two classes that inherit from this class.

class FooOne : public Foo {
public:
    void bar();
}

and

class FooTwo : public Foo {
public:
    void bar();
}

Now in a completely different class, I want to create an array in a function that can hold instances of one of these two classes. The problem that I'm running into is that I cannot create an array with a dynamic type like this, can I? I'm used to Objective-C where I can create an object of type id.

Ideally, this is what I was looking for (pseudocode):

void someFunction(FooType type) {
    class aClass = (type == FooTypeOne ? FooOne : FooTwo);
    vector<aClass> container;

    // Do something with the container.
}

Note: I cannot use C++11 in this project.

share|improve this question
    
You can have an array of pointers (vector of smart pointers). –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 4:50
    
Pointers are an option, but I would like to avoid them if possible in this case. I'd be willing to use smart pointers, but that forces me to include Boost which I can't do. –  Yep Feb 1 '13 at 4:51
    
No C++11? They're very worthwhile over normal pointers. The normal is to let it delegate to the proper implementation, so you can just have an array of pointers to the base class and use arr[i]->bar(); to let it choose which one to use. –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 4:53
    
Nope unfortunately I'm working on a project that is part of a homework assignment and my grader doesn't let us use C++11. This really is unrelated to the homework but I like perfection in my classes and I feel bad duplicating code to get around a problem like this. –  Yep Feb 1 '13 at 5:04
    
There is a pre-C++11, non-boost smart pointer that you can put in a container - std::tr1::shared_ptr`. –  lego Feb 1 '13 at 5:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use smart pointer in STL container:

Foo* MakeFoo(FooType type)
{
  switch(type)
  { 
  case FooTypeOne :
    return new FooOne();
    break;
  case FooTypeTwo :
    return new FooTwo();
    break;
  default:
    break;
  }
  return null;
}

void someFunction(FooType type) 
{
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo> > container;
    std::shared_ptr<Foo> f_ptr(MakeFoo(type));
    container.push_back(f_ptr);

    // Do something with the container.
    for(std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo> >::iterator iter = container.begin(); 
        iter != container.end(); iter++)
    {
       (*iter)->bar();  // call derived object's bar function respectively 
    }
}

As you are using C++03, shared_ptr is available under std::tr1

Note: You need to add virtual destructor to Foo

class Foo {
public:
    virtual ~Foo() {}
    virtual void bar() = 0;
};

Otherwise, you get undefined behavior if you delete an object of a derived type through a pointer to the base.

share|improve this answer
    
One note: You're using C++11 already, so you might as well use nullptr. –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 5:01
    
@chris thanks, updated –  billz Feb 1 '13 at 5:02
    
As I mentioned in a comment above, unfortunately I'm not allowed to use C++11 in this project. This would make it very easy. An upvote for you anyway as I should have mentioned that before. –  Yep Feb 1 '13 at 5:04
    
If you don't use C++11, just replace nullptr with NULL(null), don't use auto then it should be ok –  billz Feb 1 '13 at 5:05
    
container.push_back(MakeFoo(type)); seems to be having issues with putting a pointer in there, is that really correct? Getting compiler errors when I attempt to insert it. –  Yep Feb 1 '13 at 5:15

The only easy and clean option that I can think of is is templates. i.e if you want to avoid pointers as you say.

template <typename FooType>
void SomeFunction() {
    vector<FooType> container;

    // Do something with the container.
}


void SomeFunctionCaller(){
...
    if(type == "FooOne")
        SomeFunction<FooOne>();
    else
        SomeFunction<FooTwo>();

}

But it is quite different from your design and not sure if it will fit.

Edit: Ah if you are Ok with smart pointers then that is the way to go.

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