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Consider the following:

class Specimen
{
public:
enum Gender getGender();
private:
enum Gender { MALE=1, FEMALE=2, ALIEN=3, HYBRID=4};
}

This part as well:

Gender gender;

under private

enum Gender Specimen::getGender()
{
    return gender;
}

that's a member function the compiler says "error C2440: 'return': cannot convert from 'Specimen::gender' to 'Gender' I also tried removing the "enums" from the function def and the function prototype

I am not sure what I need to fix

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2 Answers 2

Specimen is not in scope and so you have to qualify it:

enum Specimen::Gender Specimen::getGender()
{
    return gender;
}

This works too in C++11:

auto Specimen::getGender() -> Gender
{
    return gender;
}
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does the function prototype stay the same? –  SyntacticSugar Feb 1 '13 at 5:04
    
@MuadDib42 Yes. Gender is in-scope when used inside the class body. –  Pubby Feb 1 '13 at 5:06
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It's unclear how and where gender and getGender() are declared/defined, but the following compiles:

class Specimen
{
public:
    enum Gender { MALE=1, FEMALE=2, ALIEN=3, HYBRID=4};
    Gender getGender();
private:
    Gender gender;
};

Specimen::Gender Specimen::getGender()
{
    return gender;
}

int main() {}

See it work here.

Note that enum Gender was moved above the getGender() declaration, and Gender is qualified as Specimen::Gender in the getGender() definition.

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