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I have such values in these two table. I want to check duplicates in TableA and TableB

    TABLEA
    StaffName   Shift   Hrs
    ABC           1      12
    DEF                  23
    XYZ           2          


    TABLEB
    StaffN       Sft   Hrs
    ABC           1      12
    DEF                  23
    XYZ           2          

However when i do a

  SELECT * FROM TABLEA 
  WHERE NOT EXISTS 
  (SELECT * FROM TABLEB.StaffN = TABLEA.StaffName AND
  TABLEB.Sft = TABLEA.Shift AND
  TABLEB.Hrs = TABLEA.Hrs); 

Why would i be returned of DEF and XYZ? is it becuz of the empty value? And how can i change my select statment to check if both value empty, its the same.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you were right to suspect Nulls.

Consider the 3 values in the "DEF" rows: DEF; Null; and 23. A human might say those rows are duplicates because all 3 values are the same in both tables.

However, the subquery asks the db engine to consider whether TABLEB.Sft = TABLEA.Shift. And there is the problem ... a Null can never be equal to anything, not even another Null.

See whether this Immediate window session clarifies the situation.

? 1 = 1
True
? 1 = 2
False
? 1 = Null
Null
? Null = Null
Null

So when both fields are Null, the comparison TABLEB.Sft = TABLEA.Shift is evaluated as Null. The db engine will only include rows where the comparison is True, so those "DEF" rows are excluded. And the same logic explains why the "XYZ" rows are excluded.

You need a comparison which returns True when both TABLEB.Sft and TABLEA.Shift are Null, and also returns True when both contain the same non-Null values.

(TABLEB.Sft Is Null AND TABLEA.Shift Is Null)
OR
(TABLEB.Sft = TABLEA.Shift)

Try this query:

SELECT *
FROM
    TABLEA AS a
    INNER JOIN TABLEB AS b
    ON a.StaffName = b.StaffN
WHERE
    (
        (a.Shift Is Null AND b.Sft Is Null)
        OR
        (a.Shift = b.Sft)
    )
    AND
    (
        (a.Hrs Is Null AND b.Hrs Is Null)
        OR
        (a.Hrs = b.Hrs)
    );
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wa but i got 27 columns, meaning have to do it the hard way? –  10e5x Feb 1 '13 at 6:19
    
Yeah, that's a challenge. But it would have been a challenge to expand your original approach to 27 columns, too. You can use Nz() as @sgeddes suggested provided none of the stored numbers are zeros. Or substitute some other "magic" number instead of zero ... if all the stored numbers are positive, you could use Nz(a.Shift, -1) = Nz(b.Sft, -1) in the comparison. –  HansUp Feb 1 '13 at 6:27
    
Beware Nz() can only be used when the query is run from within an Access session. If you need to run the query from outside Access (like from Dot.Net or Classic ASP), Nz() will not be available. In that case you can use IIf() instead: IIf(a.Shift Is Null, -1, a.Shift) = IIf(b.Sft Is Null, -1, b.Sft) Nulls are challenging! –  HansUp Feb 1 '13 at 6:30
    
May i ask, in access, empty values means null? sry not used to access –  10e5x Feb 1 '13 at 6:33
    
If you have a text or memo field which contains an empty string (a string value of 0 length, ""), that field would appear "empty". But that kind of empty is not the same as Null. For dates, Yes/No, and other number fields, empty means Null. –  HansUp Feb 1 '13 at 6:36

You could wrap your where criteria around the NZ function to see if that helps, like:

NZ(TABLEB.Hrs,0) = NZ(TABLEA.Hrs,0)
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