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Consider the useful code by Zaita posted at cplusplus.com, in particular the part which gets numbers safely, modified to be a function in my case:

int get_number()
{
   /**
    * cplusplus.com/forum/articles/6046
    * gets number from input stream
    **/

   string input = "";
   int number = 0;

   while (true)
   {
      getline(cin, input);
      stringstream checks(input);
      if (checks >> number)
         return number;
      cout << "Please enter a valid number\n";
   }
}

Now, my question is this: Can I remove the int on the first line of the function definition for get_number(), and declare it at the top of my code with all the types I might want to return such as doing some declarations like this:

double get_number();
int get_number();
long get_number();
unsigned short get_number();
...
...

And somehow get it to do different returns depending on the variable I want to store the return from the function with? Currently I simply writing multiple definitions of essentially the same function while changing the name to get_someType

I am hoping I can do something like declare with this sort of syntax:

int get_number(int);
double get_double(double);
...
...

And my desire would be to do something like:

int x;
x = get_number(int);

I am sure this will NOT work however! Because it would be impossible to define the function's source code with parameters with no names...

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4  
Look for templates. –  zmbq Feb 1 '13 at 5:55
    
@zmbq Given that I am so new to this language, perhaps you could share a link on templates that you find useful, and helps me find the solution easier? –  Leonardo Feb 1 '13 at 5:57
    
One tricky thing you need to watch out for: you must know the type you want to return at compile time if you use the function templates method. In other words, the caller must know (hard-code) exactly the type it wants returned. If you need to dynamically return the type (letting the function decide the type), you need to use something like boost::variant or wrap all the return types in a union/class yourself, and do a lot of manipulation. –  kfmfe04 Feb 1 '13 at 6:09
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're looking for function templates!

This code is buggy (please don't use cplusplus.com as a reference), since it doesn't check that input from std::cin is received.

A templated example would look something like this (untested):

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

template <typename T>
T get_number()
{
    std::string input = "";
    T number; // Don't initialise to zero
    bool done = false;

    while (!done)
    {
        if (std::getline(std::cin, input)) // check for success
        {
            std::istringstream checks(input);
            if (checks >> number)
            {
                done = true;
            }
            else
            {
                std::cout << "Please enter a valid number\n";
            }
        }
        else
        {
            throw std::runtime_error("No input was received\n");
        }
    }
    return number;
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        int i = get_number<int>();
        float f = get_number<float>();
        double d = get_number<double>();
        char b = get_number<char>();
    }
    catch (const std::runtime_error& e)
    {
        std::cerr << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
}

To incorporate my comment below into this answer... In a class template or function template, typename can be used as an alternative to class to declare templated types. I prefer typename because we're dealing with POD-types and not classes.

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what if I say non-numeric type? will T number=0 work? –  Aniket Feb 1 '13 at 6:00
    
Why would you use a non-numeric type with a function called get_number()? No... some error checking will be needed if this is called as <std::string> or char* or ... . –  Johnsyweb Feb 1 '13 at 6:03
    
that's what I am trying to tell you.. error checking. Or remove the 'T number =0;` and say T number;. –  Aniket Feb 1 '13 at 6:04
    
Interesting that the other answer uses template <class T> while you are using <typename T> nice example, thank you! –  Leonardo Feb 1 '13 at 6:06
    
Thanks @Aniket: cplusplus.com is a dangerous source of information, I've included a comment in the code now. –  Johnsyweb Feb 1 '13 at 6:12
show 2 more comments

Firstly, the get_number implementation you've found is badly written: what do you think happens when you get an EOF on input? It spins around printing "Please enter a valid number\n" as fast as it can until you kill the program....

Secondly, you can't overload on return type - which means you can't have functions that only differ in the return type.

Finally, C++ has templates that can do what I think you want...

template <typename T>
bool get(T& x)
{
    std::string input;
    if (!getline(std::cin, input))
        return false;
    stringstream checks(input);
    if (checks >> x)
        return true;
    cout << "Please enter a valid value\n";
}

You can then use if (get(my_int)) ... or if (get(my_double)) etc..

As input can not be guaranteed to succeed, you really should either provide a boolean return type (as illustrated) or throw an exception once it's clear input can not succeed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out a flaw in that code, I have for some time now been trying to figure out how to make the loop no longer infinite. But it seems I cannot do while(!(checks >> number)) because I cannot figure out how to declare the stringstream type. –  Leonardo Feb 1 '13 at 6:10
    
@Leonardo: You should really use std::istringstream from the sstream header, as used in my answer. Tony's code gets my vote :) –  Johnsyweb Feb 1 '13 at 6:35
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This can be done with templates.

Here you can find out some template tutorials for beginners (start from 58..) http://thenewboston.org/list.php?cat=16

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Cool link, I really appreciate that! –  Leonardo Feb 1 '13 at 6:14
    
i used it when i'm started the c++. :) –  Arpit Feb 1 '13 at 6:17
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You can use templates, but as far as I know your function must have an argument of the type of that template as well, as in:

template <class T>
T get_number(T arg)
{
   /**
    * cplusplus.com/forum/articles/6046
    * gets number from input stream
    **/

   string input = "";
   T number = 0;

   while (true)
   {
      getline(cin, input);
      stringstream checks(input);
      if (checks >> number)
         return number;
      cout << "Please enter a valid number\n";
   }
}

The type of template (T) is resolved in compile time based on the type of argument passed to the function.

share|improve this answer
    
what if I say non-numeric type for the template? will T number = 0 work? –  Aniket Feb 1 '13 at 6:00
    
Do I have to use the keywords template <class myTypeID> before every function I use templates with, or is it possible this will affect multiple functions below it? Perhaps using brackets for example after the first line in your example? –  Leonardo Feb 1 '13 at 6:03
    
No, you have to use if for every function individually. –  Sina Iravanian Feb 1 '13 at 6:04
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template<class T>
T get_number()
{
   /**
    * cplusplus.com/forum/articles/6046
    * gets number from input stream
    **/

   string input = "";
   T genericobj;

   while (true)
   {
      getline(cin, input);
      stringstream checks(input);
      if (checks >> genericobj)
         return genericobj;
      cout << "Please enter a valid input\n" ;
   }
}
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