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As of now, I have the following in a .h file which has the following:

#define ONE 
#define TWO
#define THREE
#define FOUR
..
.
#define FIFTY

Using vi[m], how can we generate the replacement text for the macros which should be as follows:

#define ONE 1
#define TWO 2
#define THREE 3
#define FOUR 4
..
.
#define FIFTY 50

Problem statement: Given lower-limit (1), upper-limit (50) and step (i.e. increment by 1 or 2 or 3, etc at a time) - what is the vi command to automatically generate values in the above mentioned macros?

UPDATE: I have no option of using enum.

share|improve this question
    
No enum?! Stop using ancient <strike>DevC++</strike> oh <strike>Borland C++ 3.1</strike> sh*t <strike>TinyCC</strike> wait... The original K&R dialect of the C programming language did not have enumerated types, but they were added in the ANSI standard for C, which became C89 - You don't have an excuse, really. –  sehe Feb 1 '13 at 8:39
    
Can you explain why you cannot use an enum? I doubt it is because the compiler doesn't support it. –  jxh Feb 6 '13 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Go ahead and put a "1" after the #define ONE (where it should be at the final state). Go to the beginning of that line (with the cursor over the #) and press the following keys (where C-a means "ctrl+a"):

q q # record macro q
3 w h y $ j $ p C-a ^ q # end macro q
4 8 @ q # repeat macro 48x

Now the explanation:

  • qq = record a macro called "q"
  • 3w = move three words to the right
  • h = move one character left (over the space before the number)
  • y$ = yank until the end of the line
  • j = move down one line
  • $ = go to the end of the line
  • p = paste
  • C-a = increment the number under the cursor
  • ^ = go to the beginning of the line
  • q = stop recording macro
  • 48@q = run the macro 48 times

Let me know if you didn't understand, or if I understood it wrongly. It works correctly in my PC. If you want to increment by more then one at a time, simply put that multiplier in front of C-a (e.g. 3C-a)

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1  
Man, I've really got to stop using nano and bite the bullet and start using something more powerful! –  dreamlax Feb 1 '13 at 6:32

Line-select (C-V) all the lines and type

:r !awk '{print $0, NR}'
share|improve this answer
    
or just :!nl and then :norm dw$p on that selection. @: if necessary to repeat that last step. See downloads.sehe.nl/stackoverflow/14640713.mpg –  sehe Feb 1 '13 at 9:12

First of all, I assume that all those #define lines are continued, that is, there is no empty lines or other lines in between, e.g. this case doesn't exist:

#define foo

#define bar
whatever
#define another

* I added a solution for this case at the end of this answer *


Then there could be two different situations, first one is simpler, the #define block sits at the beginning of your file. which means 1st #define on 1st line.

in this case you could just do

:%s/^#define.*/\=submatch(0)."  ".line(".")/g

which will simply add line number at the end of each #define statement.

The other situation is, your #define statement block sits in the middle somewhere of the file.

This solution is more generic, also works for the first scenario.

You could add a mapping

:nnoremap <leader>do :let x=line(".")<cr>:%s/^#define.*/\=submatch(0)." ".(line(".")-x+1)/g<cr>

then move your cursor to the 1st #define statement, press <leader>do, it will do the work for you. In this way, you don't have to manually insert "1", don't have to record macro either.

it works like: enter image description here

external cmd in vim (awk)

awk is nuclear weapon of text processing, using awk in this case also a nice way to go. it could handle those separated #define statements for example: your file looks like:

/*
   comments
*/
#define ONE 

//comment
#define TWO



//empty lines
#define THREE

#define FOUR

if you in vim type :

:%!awk '/^\#define/{$0= $0" "++x}1'

your file turns into:

/*
   comments
*/
#define ONE  1

//comment
#define TWO 2



//empty lines
#define THREE 3

#define FOUR 4
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining various cases and solution for them! Excellent. Thanks! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Feb 7 '13 at 9:33

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