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Odd even number printing using thread I came across this question and wanted to discuss solution in C++ . What I can think of using 2 binary semaphores odd and even semaphore. even semaphore initialized to 1 and odd initialized to 0.

**T1 thread function** 
funOdd()
{  
  wait(even)  
  print odd;  
  signal(odd)  
}


**T2 thread function**
funEven()  
{  
  wait(odd)  
  print even  
  signal(even)  
}  

In addition to this if my functions are generating only number and there is a third thread T3 which is going to print those numbers then what should be ideal design ? I used an array where odd number will be placed at odd place and even number will be place at even position. T3 will read from this array this will avoid any thread saftey over this array and if T3 does not find any index then it will wait till that index gets populated. Another solution can be to use a queue which will have a mutex which can be used by T1 and T2 while insertion.

Please comment on this solution and how can i make it more efficient.

Edit to make problem much clear: Overall problem is that I have two producers (T1,T2) and a single consumer (T3), and my producers are interdependent.

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6  
If you want serial behavior don't use threads. –  bamboon Feb 1 '13 at 6:51
    
I can avoid thread in this case but this is very valid scenario where my 2 threads are dependent on each other. –  user258367 Feb 1 '13 at 7:24
2  
I'm trying really hard to follow this question, and have discovered that without code (a near-universal language, save for unusual var names) the description is muddy to follow, and in some places near-impossible. It looks like you're have two producers (T1,T2) and a single consumer (T3), but your producers are interdependent. I'm also curious how "if T3 does not find any index then it will wait till that index gets populated." is going to hold up without synchronization of some kind. Finally, "very valid"? Valid is a bit. It is, or it isn't. –  WhozCraig Feb 1 '13 at 7:34
    
@WhozCraig T3 can sleep for some time and again check for this index. if index is populated then move to next else sleep again. Why do you think we need synchronization for array Can you explain me a scenario where I will require synchronization ? –  user258367 Feb 1 '13 at 7:42
    
does this question have any follow up? in the end, what is your own answer? –  Dariusz Feb 6 '13 at 16:11
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3 Answers

I fail to understand why you want to use three separate threads for a serial behavior. But I will answer anyway:)

One solution would be to use a modified producer/consumer pattern with a prioritized queue between producers and consumers. The sort operation on the queue would depend on the integer value of the posted message. The consumer would peek an element in the queue and check if it is the next expected element. If not, it would sleep/wait.

A bit of code:

class Elt implements Comparable<Elt> {
  int value;
  Elt(value) { this.value=value; }
  int compare(Elt elt);
}

class EltQueue extends PriorityBlockingQueue<Elt> { // you shouldn't inherit colelctions, has-a is better, but to make it short
  static EltQueue getInstance(); // singleton pattern
}

class Consumer{
  Elt prevElt = new Elt(-1);
  void work()
  {
    Elt elt = EltQueue.getInstance().peek();
    if (elt.getValue() == prevElt.getValue()+1)) {
      EltQueue.getInstance().poll();
      //do work on Elt
    }
  }
}

class Producer {
  int n=0; // or 1!
  void work() {
    EltQueue.getInstance().put(new Elt(n+=2));
  }
}
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What language is this? –  jcoder Feb 1 '13 at 8:57
    
@J99 more or less Java. Language is irrelevant, the behind it does not change –  Dariusz Feb 1 '13 at 9:55
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As a first thing, the two functions should a least contain a loop, (unless you just want a single number)

A more standard solution (which remaps your idea) is to have a global structure containing a a mutex, and two condition variables (odd and even) plus a return value, and another condition for the printing. than use a uique_lock to handle the synchronization.

IN PSEUDOCODE:

struct global_t
{
    mutex mtx;
    int value = {0};
    condition_variable be_odd, be_even, print_it;
    bool bye = {false};

    global_t() { be_odd.notify(); }
} global;

void odd_generator()
{
    int my_odd = 1;
    for(;;)
    {
        unique_lock lock(global.mtx);
        if(global.bye) return;
        global.be_odd.wait(lock);
        global_value = my_odd; my_odd+=2;
        global.print_it.notify();
        if(my_odd > 100) bye=true;
    } //let RAII to manage wait states and unlocking
};

void even_generator()
{ /* same as odd, with inverted roles */ }

void printer()
{
    for(;;)
    {
        unique_lock lock(global.mtx);
        if(bye) return;
        global.ptint_it.wait(lock);
        std::cout << global.value << std::endl;
        ((global.value & 1)? global.be_even: global.be_odd).notify();
    }
}


int main()
{
    thread oddt(odd_generator), event(even_generator), printt(printer);
    oddt.join(), event.join(), printer.join();
}

Note that, apart didactic purpose, this solution adds no value respect to a simple loop printing the value of a counter, since there will never be real concurrency.

Note also (to avoid globals) that you can wrap everything into a class (making the actual main a class method) and instantate that class on the stack inside the new main.

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Please see below working code (VS2005)

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include <iostream>
#include <process.h>

#define MAX 100
int shared_value = 0;

CRITICAL_SECTION cs;

unsigned _stdcall even_thread_cs(void *p)
{

    for( int i = 0 ; i < MAX ; i++ )
    {
        EnterCriticalSection(&cs);

        if( shared_value % 2 == 0 )
        {
            printf("\n%d", i);
        }


        LeaveCriticalSection(&cs);

    }
    return 0;
}

unsigned _stdcall odd_thread_cs(void *p)
{
    for( int i = 0 ; i < MAX ; i++ )
    {
        EnterCriticalSection(&cs);

        if( shared_value % 2 != 0 )
        {
            printf("\n%d", i);
        }

        LeaveCriticalSection(&cs);  

    }

    return 0;
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
     InitializeCriticalSection(&cs);

    _beginthreadex(NULL, NULL, even_thread_cs, 0,0, 0);
    _beginthreadex(NULL, NULL, odd_thread_cs, 0,0, 0);

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Here, using shared variable shared_value, because we are synchronizing the it. Note that sleep is not used.

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