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 class Sample
   attr_accessor :x,:y

   def initialize 
     @x = "x"
     y = "y"     
   end
 end     

 Sample.new.instance_variables  => [:@x] 

class Sample
  attr_accessor :x,:y

  def initialize 
     @x = "x"
     self.y = "y"     
  end
end  

Sample.new.instance_variables => [:@x, :@y] 

Can anyone let me know what is going on here. Why is y an instance_variable second time?

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1  
In first sample, if you assign : @y=1 , then you shall get @y as ivar as well. I surmise Ruby is optimizing in the attr_accessor, and not creating an ivar until you specifically assign to it. –  Zabba Feb 1 '13 at 7:00
    
and @Zabba : A variable does not exist until you assign a value to it. Please see stackoverflow.com/questions/13850971/… –  BernardK Feb 1 '13 at 8:04

3 Answers 3

attr_accessor :y defines methods that are roughly equivalent to

def y
  @y
end

def y=(val)
  @y = val
end

So, when you assign to self.y, you are assigning to an instance variable due to the attr_accessor macro

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Careful with the terminology. self.y = 1 is not an assignment to ivar –  Sergio Tulentsev Feb 1 '13 at 7:04
    
"assigning to an instance variable due to the ...". I thought that made it clear that macro was why you had the ivar, not the assignment :| –  Jim Deville Feb 1 '13 at 16:30

Why not? self is an instance and y is an instance var. In the first example, y is only a normal local var.

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This line

attr_accessor :y

creates a couple of methods

def y
  @y
end

def y= val
  @y = val
end

So, when you call y= method, @y instance variable jumps to life. In second snippet you correctly call y= method. But in the first one you simply create an unused local variable y (setter method is not called and ivar is not created).

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1  
It's important to note that historically attr_accessor will benchmark faster than these equivalent methods, they're C-based optimizations instead of executable code, so whenever possible you should use the attr_ declarations instead of writing your own. –  tadman Feb 1 '13 at 7:44

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