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I am very new to python and am struggling to create a program for a class. We are supposed to record the snowfall everyday for a week and round the input to one decimal place, which I did below:

def main():
    print "~*~*~*~*~*~  SNOWFALL LOG ~*~*~*~*~*~"

    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 1: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 1: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 2: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 2: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 3: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 3: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 4: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 4: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 5: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 5: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 6: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 6: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)
    snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 7: "))
    print "Snowfall for Day 7: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

main()

However, after that we are supposed to calculate the total snowfall and the average using a for loop. I know the command str(command) is also somehow involved, but I don't know how.

How should I approach this problem?

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you should accept the answer that helped you,... meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  avasal Feb 15 '13 at 7:19
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4 Answers

What I would suggest you do is put the values into a list, to store them. So before your printing put this in:

snowFallTotal = []

Now you can put values into this list. After every raw_input put this:

snowFallTotal.append(snowFall)

What this does is 'append' snowFall to the list.

Now after getting all the values, you can calculate the sum using a for loop and then dividing it by 7 to get the average.

totalSum = 0  # variable to store the sum
for i in snowFallTotal:  # iterate through the value list
    totalSum += i  # augmented addition; adds the value to the variable in place
average = totalSum / 7.0  # floating point division to get accurate average

Then you can print the result.

print 'Average Snowfall for the week:', ('%.1f' % average)

As a side note, you don't need the for loop. You can replace it with a simple sum function.

totalSum = sum(snowFallTotal)

This assigns totalSum to the sum of the elements in snowFallTotal, which is exactly what the for loop did as well.

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it keeps on averaging and totaling the most recent submitted snowFall. So Day 7 gets printed as total, and it divided by 7 is average. using the most recent value rather than compiling a list? –  user2031682 Feb 1 '13 at 8:48
    
actually i figured it out, I wasn't placing append in the right place. THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE HELP! i've been sitting here for hours rewriting this program and just needed a little help for a break through. –  user2031682 Feb 1 '13 at 8:52
    
Any reason you didn't just sum() all the values in the list? –  Alex L Feb 1 '13 at 8:52
    
@AlexL because the OP asked for a method using a for loop. I'll put it in there for completeness though, thanks. –  Volatility Feb 1 '13 at 8:53
    
@Volatility No worries! I thought the OP meant doing the prompting using a loop, not the summing - see my answer :) –  Alex L Feb 1 '13 at 8:58
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You could save a few lines of code if you used a loop:

# An empty list to hold data
snowfalls = []

# Loop through each daynumber, from 1 to 7
for daynumber in range(1,8):
    snowfall = float(raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day {}: ".format(daynumber)))
    snowfalls.append(snowfall)
    print "Snowfall for Day {}: {:.1f}".format(daynumber, snowFall)

# For debugging, print the whole list
print snowfalls

# Calculate total
total_snowfall = sum(snowfalls)
print "Total snowfall: {:.1f}".format(total_snowfall)

# Calculate average (= total / 7.0 ) 
# len() gets the length of the snowfall list
average_snowfall = total_snowfall / len (snowfalls)
print "Average snowfall: {:.1f}".format(average_snowfall)

I've used format(), which is the new way to do string formatting - it's pretty nifty :)

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that actually a pretty clever way to do it! –  user2031682 Feb 1 '13 at 8:57
    
@user2031682 Thanks, I'm glad you like it! It's a bit more flexible - to ask for 30 days of snowfall data then you can change range(1,8) to range(1,31) –  Alex L Feb 1 '13 at 9:00
    
Yeah, +1 for the looping. One thing to note though is that in Python 2 range creates a list in memory, while xrange produces an iterator, so you might be better off with xrange, especially with larger lists. (Even if it doesn't matter that much here, it's always a good habit to get used to!) –  Volatility Feb 1 '13 at 9:05
    
@Volatility Agreed - xrange should be preferred over range when performance is important, but I don't think that's the case here. It's much easier to see what range(5) does by printing it - [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]. When the OP comes back in a few months asking why their loop is taking 100MB of RAM, then I'll suggest xrange ;) –  Alex L Feb 1 '13 at 9:10
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I recommend you read your assignment specification thoroughly, and with it your class notes. It is rare that an assignment is given without enough materials for the student to complete the task.

There are lots of resources related to Python online, including official documentation which can help you with specific functions such as str().

If you have direct access to your teachers, ask them lots of questions. They can help you with any fundamental problems about how to approach programming tasks.

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I could write a function doing that, but I guess you are just starting doing this... so maybe this helps. It's not DRY (a good rule for programming is Don't Repeat Yourself), but this way might help you understand it better!

total_snowfall=0.0

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 1: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 1: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 2: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 2: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 3: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 3: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 4: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 4: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 5: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 5: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 6: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 6: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

snowFall = float (raw_input("Enter Snowfall for Day 7: "))
total_snowfall +=snowFall 
print "Snowfall for Day 7: ", ("%.1f" % snowFall)

print "total snowfall is:" ,("%.1f" % total_snowfall) #you can do some calculations here
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