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I have the following code:

def evAnd(v, *predicates):
    satisfied=True
    for f in predicates:
        if not f(v):
            satisfied=False
            # log: f,v->False in a map and other side effects
        else:
            # log: f,v->True in a map and other side effects
    return satisfied


def evOr(v, *predicates):
    satisfied=False
    for f in predicates:
        if f(v):
            satisfied=True
            # log: f,v->True in a map and other side effects
        else:
            # log: f,v->False in a map and other side effects
    return satisfied

What's the Pythonic way to unify the above in a single function? (as there is considerable side-effect code where the log messages are placed) Notice the presence of side effects and the need to evaluate the outcome for all predicates without the short-circuiting of any and all

solution based on accepted answer

So, here's what I did in the end based on the accepted answer:

def adorn(predicate):
    def rv(v):
        rvi = predicate(v)
        if rvi:
            print "%s is satisfied for value %d" % (predicate.__name__, v)
            # any other side effects
        else:
            print "%s is not satisfied for value %d" % (predicate.__name__, v)
            # any other side effects
        return rvi
    return rv


def my_all(n, predicates):
    return reduce(operator.and_, map( lambda x : x(n), map(adorn, predicates)), True)

def my_any(n, predicates):
    return reduce(operator.or_, map( lambda x : x(n) , map(adorn, predicates)), False)

It can be tested with:

def even(n):
    return n%2==0

def odd(n):
    return n%2!=0

print my_all(3, [even, odd])
print my_any(4, [even, odd])
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about simply

reduce(operator.and_, seq)

for "all", and

reduce(operator.or_, seq)

for "any".

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+1: Are you a Dutch? –  Abhijit Feb 1 '13 at 9:17
    
+1: Your reduce is simpler that mine. –  Hui Zheng Feb 1 '13 at 9:20
    
operator.and_ and operator.or_ are bitwise operations. –  Janne Karila Feb 1 '13 at 9:28

Generally speaking, if you pass a generator expression to any or all it would be short-circuited but if you make it a LC and pass it to both these built-ins, short-circuits wont be possible and you would get the effect that you wanted to pursue

The following demonstration is self explanatory and can be adapted to your problem

>>> count = 0
>>> def foo(n):
    global count
    count += 1
    return n%2

>>> any(foo(n) for n in range(10))
True
>>> count
2
>>> count = 0
>>> any([foo(n) for n in range(10)])
True
>>> count
10

As suggested by Blender, it might create a list that whould be discarded. A more generator oriented solution would be as follows

Another way to look into this problem (at least for generators) is, you want to consume the rest of the iterable if short-circuited by any or all. You can easily do so, by partly borrowing the consume itertools recipe

>>> count
0
>>> it = (foo(n) for n in range(10))
>>> any(it)
True
>>> collections.deque(it, maxlen = 0)
deque([], maxlen=0)
>>> count
10

And here are two version of any and all which would not short-circuit. Feel free to give a meaningful names to these functions (which I am really bad with)

>>> def all_noss(expr):
    it = iter(expr)
    result = any(it)
    collections.deque(it, maxlen = 0)
    return result

>>> def any_noss(expr):
    it = iter(expr)
    result = any(it)
    collections.deque(it, maxlen = 0)
    return result
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The problem with the list comprehension is that it creates a list in-memory, which isn't always desirable. If memory wasn't a problem, any(list(iterable)) would work perfectly. –  Blender Feb 1 '13 at 8:29
    
@Blender: I agree, see my update –  Abhijit Feb 1 '13 at 8:37
    
If memory is a concern, we could use generator and reduce as my answer proposed. –  Hui Zheng Feb 1 '13 at 9:13
    
@HuiZheng: You can see the second part of my answer which addresses this issue –  Abhijit Feb 1 '13 at 9:15

You may take use of reduce:

def evAnd(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x and y, [f(v) for f in predicates])

def evOr(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x or y, [f(v) for f in predicates])

Or take use of all or any:

def evAnd(v, *predicates):
    return all([f(v) for f in predicates])

def evOr(v, *predicates):
    return any([f(v) for f in predicates])

Since the above methods create a list comprehension, all predicates WILL be evaluated without short-circuit.

UPDATE:

The shortcoming of list comprehensions is they create list in-memory, if that's your concern, we can use generator instead:

def evAnd(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x and y, (f(v) for f in predicates))

def evOr(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x or y, (f(v) for f in predicates))

This time we have to use reduce, while all or any will have short-circuit which is not desirable.

Reminded by @NPE, we can replace lambda with operator:

def evAnd(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(operator.and_,  (f(v) for f in predicates))

def evOr(v, *predicates):
    return reduce(operator.or_,  (f(v) for f in predicates))
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