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Usually we know in order to access a static variable we need not to create an instance of the class. We can directly do like classname.staticvariable. And in order to access the static variable inside the class we should have a static method.

Now I have a doubt with the following code snippet

public class xyz
{
    private static int a;

    public xyz()
    {
        a++;
    }
}

Will the above code snippet work? If yes why and if no why?

Thanks Prabhanjan

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16  
Will it work? You have a compiler. Try it. –  Oded Feb 1 '13 at 8:46
    
Quicker to post to SO, obviously. –  Evan Trimboli Feb 1 '13 at 8:47
2  
It is other way around. You can't use non-static variable in static method while you are allowed to use static variable in non-static method (but you need to remember about concurrency issues). –  tpeczek Feb 1 '13 at 8:50
1  
Please note that a will not always contain the amount of created xyz when you use Thread. Multiple threads could access the variable at once and leave an unpredictable result. –  JustAnotherUserYouMayKnow Feb 1 '13 at 9:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To quote from the C# documentation on static variables:

Static members are initialized before the static member is accessed for the first time and before the static constructor, if there is one, is called.

For example run the following sample program:

using System;

namespace ScrapCSConsole
{
   class ScrapCSConsole
   {
      public static void Main()
      {
         Console.WriteLine("Create StaticDemo A");
         StaticDemo a = new StaticDemo();
         Console.WriteLine("Create StaticDemo B");
         StaticDemo b = new StaticDemo();
         Console.WriteLine("Done");
      }
   }

   class StaticDemo
   {
      private static int staticDemo1;
      private static int staticDemo2 = 0;
      private static int staticDemo3 = default(int);
      private static int staticDemo4;
      private static int classNumber;

      /// <summary>
      /// Static Constructor
      /// </summary>
      static StaticDemo()
      {
         Console.WriteLine("Static Constructor");
         Console.WriteLine("staticDemo1 {0}", staticDemo1);
         staticDemo4 = (new DateTime(1999, 12, 31)).DayOfYear;
      }

      /// <summary>
      /// Instance Constructor
      /// </summary>    
      public StaticDemo()
      {
         classNumber++;
         Console.WriteLine("classNumber {0}", classNumber);
         Console.WriteLine("staticDemo2 {0}", staticDemo2);
         Console.WriteLine("staticDemo3 {0}", staticDemo3);
         Console.WriteLine("staticDemo4 {0}", staticDemo4);                  
      }      
   }
}

And you get the following output:

Create StaticDemo A
Static Constructor 
staticDemo1 0
classNumber 1
staticDemo2 0
staticDemo3 0
staticDemo4 365
Create StaticDemo B
classNumber 2
staticDemo2 0
staticDemo3 0
staticDemo4 365
Done

There are some interesting things to note here:

  1. The line 'Console.WriteLine("Create StaticDemo A")' gets called before StaticDemo's static constructor.
  2. The line 'Console.WriteLine("Static Constructor")' only gets called once.
  3. The line 'Console.WriteLine("staticDemo1 {0}", staticDemo1)' works even though staticDemo1 has never been explicitly initialized.
  4. staticDemo1, staticDemo2 and staticDemo 3 all start out as 0 in value.

Finally as a sub note you need to be careful if you are creating the objects on multiple threads. This is because classNumber++ is not an atomic operation. It counts as two seperate operations one read and one write. As such two seperate threads can both read the variable before either one of them writes out the incremented value. To avoid this situation use this line instead:

System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(ref classNumber);
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Yes it will. The int will have a default value of 0. Everytime the constructor is called you will increase your static variable.

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1  
Explain when a is set to 0. –  Cédric Bignon Feb 1 '13 at 8:49
    
That will be on CLR level :) but as soon as you hit your variable and it hasn't been intiated it will get it's default value. 0 in case of an int –  Jeroen Feb 1 '13 at 8:55
    
Ok fine but my query is how a non static member function(constructor is also a special member function without any return type and having the name of the class) can access a static variable? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:05
    
The static member is valid for any instance of your Object. It is a value that will be the same everytime you access the object. So the non-static method (constructor) can access the static variable. But it will be shared with all other instances of that object. If you want you can even write a static method to read your static variable to get it's value without even creating the object. –  Jeroen Feb 1 '13 at 9:12
    
You can even set the default value of your static variable to another value by creating a static default constructor where you assign a custom value –  Jeroen Feb 1 '13 at 9:13

It works.

Imagine you want to know how many instance of a class has been created. So in this case you can use

xyz.a 

Also to monitor number of lived instances you can create a destructor and use a--.

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Ya it works fine but how a non static member function(constructor) is able to access the static member? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:06
    
static members are somehow shared between all the non static members (instance members). -I'm not sure if I understand you comment's question quietly!- –  Hossein Narimani Rad Feb 1 '13 at 9:09

It is perfectly fine to access a static member from an instance method.

The static variable a has a default value of 0 and your code increments it each time you create an instance of the class.

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The above snippet will perfectly work fine. Such kind of code is written to count the number of live instances present for a class.

public class xyz
{
    private static int a;

    public xyz()
    {
        a++;
    }

    public static int A
    {
        get { return a;}
    }
}

Print number of live instances as:

Console.WriteLine(obj.A);
share|improve this answer
    
But how come a non static member function is accessing the static member function in this case it is a constructor? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:09
    
You can access static variable inside a non-static method. but the other way round is not allowed. –  mihirj Feb 1 '13 at 9:10

the following assumption is not correct;

in order to access the static variable inside the class we should have a static method.

The code you have provided works since you do not need a static method.

try the following and you will see it also works;

public class xyz
{
    private static int a;

    public void A()
    {
        a++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why I don't need the static method? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:08
1  
@PrabhanjanKumarMahapatra because in order to access a static variable, you do not need to declare a method as static. –  daryal Feb 1 '13 at 9:14

Yes it will work. You can refer static member in instance members but can not refer instance members in static members because they need instance to work and static does not.

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Ok then how the static variable is being accessed inside the non static method(constructor)? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:07
    
how means you are asking syntax or reason? –  D J Feb 1 '13 at 9:20
    
I am asking the reason? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:22
    
static means common to all instance. why you think it can not be accessed? –  D J Feb 1 '13 at 9:24
    
that is what I am trying to find out why the static means common to all instance and how a static can be accessed in non static member functions? –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:28

It doesn't work if you want access to static var, you must decalar it public and Constructor method doesn't run, because constructors runs when you use initialize a class and create an object.

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Wtf? Of course it works. This is perfect valid code. –  JustAnotherUserYouMayKnow Feb 1 '13 at 9:12
    
Edalat.. it works man... and of course why it works is being answered by tpeczek (in one of the comment) –  Prabhanjan Kumar Mahapatra Feb 1 '13 at 9:17
    
He wants access to var "Private" a without initialize xyz Class. –  Mohammadreza Feb 1 '13 at 9:17
    
Prabhanjan...Really it works? –  Mohammadreza Feb 1 '13 at 9:25
    
He's accessing a private variable from within the class. That's valid. Static variables are initialized when the class is first accessed - so the variable will be initialized before using the instance constructor. Nothing wrong here. –  JustAnotherUserYouMayKnow Feb 1 '13 at 10:37

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