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Working with JavaScript from time to time, I try to use a pattern I was getting used to with another language. It's when the function result is about success of the operation and one of the parameters is the reference to the actual returned value.

Knowing that there's no passing by reference in JavaScript, the only way is to use objects (including arrays). So something like

function getSomething(res)
{
  if (....)
  {
    res["value"] = 123;
    return true;
  } else
    return false;
}

But this leads to several inconveniences. One of them is when I actually use this function, I should not forget about the convention so my natural way to deal with this is

  var value = {};  
  if (getSomething(value))
  {
    if (value == 123)
    {
    }
  }  

when the right way which I should remember is

...
if (value["value"] == 123)
...

Also if I forget to initialize value with {} then I get another error.

So, maybe it's a question for those who mix languages. What is a convention you consider convenient for such return pattern?

UPDATE: As an example of an actual code fragment that would appear in a C program

if (getSomethingA(&res1) && getSomethingB(&res2) && getSomethingC(&res3)) {
     ...   
     v = res1*res2*res3;
     ...
} 

I can not figure out how can I implement something like this in JavaScript without "not so easy to always remember conventions" or too many lines.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your first priority is to code most similarly to your C example, you could pass your getSomething() functions an object, in which case you can manipulate it by reference very well and at the same time return a separate value (also check out this fiddle):

var someA = {}, someB={}, someC={};

if(getSomethingA(someA) && getSomethingB(someB) && getSomethingC(someC)) {
    var values = [someA.value, someB.value, someC.value];
    alert('Success...Values are:\n' + values.join('\n'));
} else {
    alert('Failure!');
}

function getSomethingA(refObj) {
    if(...) {
        refObj.value = 123;
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

function getSomethingB(refObj) {
    if(...) {
        refObj.value = 456;
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

function getSomethingC(refObj) {
    if(...) {
        refObj.value = 789;
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the working example. Seems like this property notation is better than the one with arrays in my question. – Maksee Feb 1 '13 at 11:28
    
@Maksee Your example is also utilizing property notation! obj['value'] is the same as obj.value. JavaScript arrays are always and only index based. – MCL Feb 1 '13 at 12:27

Why don't you create a response object and have some fields in it for status and actual response value. Return that object every time, rather than returning false on false and array on true

For success

 response=new Object();
 response.status=true;
 response.value="Response string";
 return response;

For failure

response=new Object();
 response.status=false;
 response.value="Response string";
 return response;

You could also use an alternative syntax to avoid extra line

response={status:true,value:"Response string"};
share|improve this answer
    
It's an extra line for assigning to an object and still requires some kind of convention (naming of properties). – Maksee Feb 1 '13 at 9:11
3  
@Maksee You asked What is a convention you consider convenient for such return pattern?. I consider that convenient :) – Hanky 웃 Panky Feb 1 '13 at 9:13
    
return {status:true, value:"Response string"} – Jan Dvorak Feb 1 '13 at 9:16
    
The alternative syntax is actually much better than the primary one ;-) – Jan Dvorak Feb 1 '13 at 9:17
    
Yeah it surely is, just put up the primary one for better explanation :) – Hanky 웃 Panky Feb 1 '13 at 9:17

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