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Suppose I have this interfaces and concretes:

public interface MeterValue {}
public class MeterValueA implements MeterValue {}
public class MeterValueB implements MeterValue {}

public interface ReportBuilder<T extends MeterValue> {} 
public class ReportBuilderA implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueA> {}
public class ReportBuilderB implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueB> {}

And I have a global instance:

ReportBuilder<MeterValue> reportBuilder;

I would like to vary the reportBuilder instance as follows:

if (isA())
   reportBuilder = new ReportBuilderA();
else
   reportBuilder = new ReportBuilderB();

reportBuilder.desiredMethod();

Doing this I get "Type Missmatch". How can I get my desired functionality? Or how could I improve my class design to be more flexible?

Edit:

The wildcard ? solved the problem. But also introduced other problems. Say i have this methods in the interface:

public interface ReportBuilder<T extends MeterValue> {
     public String getStuff(List<T> values);
} 

public class ReportBuilderA implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueA> {
     @Override
     public String getStuff(List<MeterValueA> values) { return "A"; }
}

public class ReportBuilderB implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueB> {
     @Override
     public String getStuff(List<MeterValueB> values) { return "B"; }
}

Say I have this instance:

  ReportBuilder<? extends MeterValue> reportBuilder = new ReportBuilderA();

And:

  List<? extends MeterValue> list = new ArrayList<MeterValueA>();
  String s = reportBuilder.getStuff(list);

The call to getStuff(...) will not work since list contain wildcards. One fix would be to modify the ReportBuilder interface method to:

public String getStuff(List<? extends MeterValue> values);

But then I break the concrete ReportBuilders. (list is also a global instance where the content may vary)

Any ideas?

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2 Answers

I think you should declare the report builder variable as:

ReportBuilder<? extends MeterValue> reportBuilder;

This allows reportBuilder to have any ReportBuilder class, with generic type of MeterValue, or any class implementing the interface.

By the way, if you are not familiar with it already, creating the ReportBuilder instances seems to resemble the factory method pattern, it might be worth reading up on it. (and of course the other patterns too.)

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Thanks. I have implemented the Factory Pattern, sort of. Lets say the concrete ReportBuilders is the products to create. Then the factory should create the different products. In any case, I have to decide which factory to create? Then why not create the product directly. Maybe it will be more flexible/extendible the Factory Pattern way. –  Filip Feb 1 '13 at 10:59
1  
@Filip I think there is a bit of confusion here. The abstract factory and the factory method pattern are different! The abstract factory provides an interface to be implemented by the concrete factories, which contains the method that creates the instances. The factory method is just that separate method that creates the appropriate instance - so each concrete factory implementation in an abstract factory pattern has a factory method - the one creating the instances. For now it seems you only need this method - so only one factory. So you will have a factory creating builder instances... –  ppeterka Feb 1 '13 at 13:12
    
Okay. I have a class; "BuilderFactory" which has a static factory method returning the "corect" builder instance. –  Filip Feb 1 '13 at 13:20
    
@Filip I think in your case, that is exactly the right approach. I'm pleased to find someone cares about coding nice :) Keep up the good, quality work! –  ppeterka Feb 1 '13 at 13:45
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public interface MeterValue {}

public class MeterValueA implements MeterValue {}

public class MeterValueB implements MeterValue {}

public interface ReportBuilder<T extends MeterValue> {
    void desiredMethod();
}

public class ReportBuilderA implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueA> {
    @Override
    public void desiredMethod() {}
}

public class ReportBuilderB implements ReportBuilder<MeterValueB> {
    @Override
    public void desiredMethod() {}
}

void f() {
    ReportBuilder<? extends MeterValue> reportBuilder = null;

    if (Math.random() > 0.5)
        reportBuilder = new ReportBuilderA();
    else
        reportBuilder = new ReportBuilderB();

    reportBuilder.desiredMethod();
}

Where: ReportBuilder<? extends MeterValue> means generic parameter can extend MeterValue interface.

See tutorial to read more explanations about the wildcard declaration.


Note: please review this code in your particular case to avoid Parallel inheritance smell. If to add some new MeterValue you should add ReportBuilder it should mean you have probably this problem.


EDIT:

You cannot pass array with subtypes of MeterValue to ReportBuilderA which requeires at least MeterValueA. It is not type safe technic. Instantiate concrete class after inheritance is more appropriate for C++. In Java it is better do not change restricted type after inheritance.

Probable solution, maybe applicable for your concrete case:

1) Use single interface for MeterValue. All differences move to ReportBuilder inheritance. This means you have the parallel inheritance in your project.

2) Use concrete List<MeterValueA> when call getStuff() method. All shared logic for processing List<MeterValueA> and List<MeterValueB> move to methods with signature: public void sharedLogic(List<? extends MeterValue> list)

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Thanks. The wildcard ? solved the problem. But it also gave me other problems: See edit. –  Filip Feb 1 '13 at 10:02
    
Okay, I see. So I must have a List of concrete objects when calling the getStuff() method? Do you meen that i should change the signature of the arguments in getStuff(...) to List<? extends MeterValue>? In that case I must type-cast the elements in the method, which was my intention to get rid of from the start. –  Filip Feb 1 '13 at 13:32
    
In solution 2) you shouldn't change the signature of getStuff(). You should pass List with concrete generic parameters to getStuff(). –  Taky Feb 1 '13 at 13:42
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