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I have a file temp.txt, that I want to sort with the "sort" command in bash.

I want the sorted results to replace the original file.

This doesn't work for example (I get an empty file):

sortx temp.txt > temp.txt

Can this be done in one line without resorting to copying to temporary files?

EDIT: The -o option is very cool for sort. I used "sort" in my question as an example. I run into the same problem with other commands: uniq temp.txt > temp.txt. Is there a better general soluiton?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 137 down vote accepted
sort temp.txt -o temp.txt
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2  
This is an answer. I was actually wondering if there is a generic solution to this problem. For example if I want to find all UNIQ lines in a file "in place", I can't do -o –  jm. Sep 28 '08 at 21:45
    
It's not generic, but you can use -u with GNU sort to find unique lines –  James Apr 24 '10 at 21:45
    
Has anyone solved the problem to allow e.g. sort --inplace *.txt? That would be crazy cool –  sehe Apr 24 at 13:32
3  
for i in *txt ; do sort -o $i $i ; done –  David Mackintosh Aug 29 at 12:24

A sort needs to see all input before it can start to output. For this reason, the sort program can easily offer an option to modify a file in-place:

sort temp.txt -o temp.txt

Specifically, the documentation of GNU sort says:

Normally, sort reads all input before opening output-file, so you can safely sort a file in place by using commands like sort -o F F and cat F | sort -o F. However, sort with --merge (-m) can open the output file before reading all input, so a command like cat F | sort -m -o F - G is not safe as sort might start writing F before cat is done reading it.

While the documentation of BSD sort says:

If [the] output-file is one of the input files, sort copies it to a temporary file before sorting and writing the output to [the] output-file.

Commands such as uniq can start writing output before they finish reading the input. These commands typically do not support in-place editing (and it would be harder for them to support this feature).

You typically work around this with a temporary file, or if you absolutely want to avoid having an intermediate file, you could use a buffer to store the complete result before writing it out. For example, with perl:

uniq temp.txt | perl -e 'undef $/; $_ = <>; open(OUT,">temp.txt"); print OUT;'

Here, the perl part reads the complete output from uniq in variable $_ and then overwrites the original file with this data. You could do the same in the scripting language of your choice, perhaps even in Bash. But note that it will need enough memory to store the entire file, this is not advisable when working with large files.

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Here's a more general approach, works with uniq, sort and whatnot.

{ rm file && uniq > file; } < file
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11  
Another generic approach, with sponge from the moreutils: cat file |frobnicate |sponge file. –  Tobu Mar 16 '11 at 20:04
2  
@Tobu: why not submit that as a separate answer? –  Flimm Aug 31 '11 at 17:03

Tobu's comment on sponge warrants being an answer in its own right.

To quote from the moreutils homepage:

Probably the most general purpose tool in moreutils so far is sponge(1), which lets you do things like this:

% sed "s/root/toor/" /etc/passwd | grep -v joey | sponge /etc/passwd

However, sponge suffers from the same problem Steve Jessop comments on here. If any of the commands in the pipeline before sponge fail, then the original file will be written over.

$ mistyped_command my-important-file | sponge my-important-file
mistyped-command: command not found

Uh-oh, my-important-file is gone.

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Sponge knows that it will be used to replace the input file and it initially creates a temp file to avoid a race condition. In order for this to work, sponge must be the last element in the pipeline and it must be allowed to create the output file itself (as opposed to shell-level output redirection, for example). BTW: It seems like an easy source-code fix for the 'fail' case would be to not rename the temp file in the case of a pipefail (don't know why sponge doesn't have that option). –  nobar Mar 6 at 17:08

Here you go, one line:

sort temp.txt > temp.txt.sort && mv temp.txt.sort temp.txt

Technically there's no copying to a temporary file, and the 'mv' command should be instant.

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4  
Hm. I'd still call temp.txt.sort a temporary file. –  JesperE Sep 28 '08 at 18:39
4  
This code is risky, because if sort fails for whatever reason without completing its job, the original is overwritten. –  Steve Jessop Sep 28 '08 at 20:19
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Lack of disk space being a plausible cause, or a signal (user hits CTRL-C). –  Steve Jessop Sep 28 '08 at 20:25
4  
if you want to use something like this use && (logical and) instead of ; because using that will make sure that if a command fails next one will not be executed. for example: cp backup.tar /root/backup.tar && rm backup.tar if you don't have rights to copy you'll be safe as the file won't be deleted –  daniels Sep 28 '08 at 20:46
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changed my answer to take your suggestions into account, thanks –  davr Sep 29 '08 at 14:58

Many have mentioned the -o option. Here is the man page part.

From the man page:

   -o output-file
          Write output to output-file instead of to the  standard  output.
          If  output-file  is  one of the input files, sort copies it to a
          temporary file before sorting and writing the output to  output-
          file.
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This would be highly memory constrained, but you could use awk to store the intermediate data in memory, and then write it back out.

uniq temp.txt | awk '{line[i++] = $0}END{for(j=0;j<i;j++){print line[j]}}' > temp.txt
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I like the sort file -o file answer but don't want to type the same file name twice.

Using BASH history expansion:

$ sort file -o !#^

grabs the current line's first arg when you press enter.

A unique sort in-place:

$ sort -u -o file !#$

grabs the last arg in the current line

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Read up on the non-interactive editor, 'ex'

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heh -- that's a totally evil idea. I like it. –  David Mackintosh Aug 29 at 12:28

Use the argument --output= or -o

Just tried on FreeBSD: sort temp.txt -otemp.txt

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To add the uniq capability, what are the downsides to: sort inputfile | uniq | sort -o inputfile

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If you insist on using the "sort" program, you have to use a intermediate file -- I don't think "sort" has an option for sorting in memory. Any other trick with stdin/stdout will fail unless you can guarantee that the buffer size for sort's stdin is big enough to fit the entire file.

Edit: shame on me. "sort temp.txt -o temp.txt" works excellent.

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I read the Q also as being "in-place" but the second read made me believe he wasn't really asking for it –  epatel Sep 28 '08 at 20:03

cat temp.txt | sort > temp.txt

duh... that does not work, I made a slight mistake when testing (I used >> instead of >) and jsut gave the impression that it worked.....

the -o option is the right answer.

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3  
Nope. Tried that, didn't work. cat and sort will compete for writing to temp.txt. –  JesperE Sep 28 '08 at 18:44

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