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I have a statistics table with ~600k records in it, on which i perform the following (raw sql) query to get statistical data for a graph:

SELECT 
(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(s.date)*1000+3600000) as time,
ROUND((s.loadtime / s.loadtimeMeasurements), 3) as loadtime 
FROM mw_statistics s 
WHERE s.type = 0 
    AND s.date >= '2013-02-01 07:52:06' 
    AND s.date <= '2013-02-01 11:52:06' 
    AND s.product_id IN (1,8,9,10,11) 
GROUP BY s.date

This query takes approximately 1 second to complete. I would like it to take just few hundred ms. Any idea how i might improve this query? I am using Symfony2/Doctrine with a mysql database and innodb engine.

Regards, Jasper

Here's a structure dump of the table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mw_statistics` (
`id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`contentErrors` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`contentMeasurements` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`thirdpartyErrors` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`thirdpartyMeasurements` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`applicationErrors` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`applicationMeasurements` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`loadtime` double NOT NULL,
`loadtimeMeasurements` smallint(6) NOT NULL,
`unavailable` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`unavailableMeasurements` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`type` smallint(6) NOT NULL,
`step` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`date` datetime NOT NULL,
`status` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
`url` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
`product_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
`script_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `IDX_FC665E6F4584665A` (`product_id`),
KEY `IDX_FC665E6FA1C01850` (`script_id`),
KEY `date` (`date`) 
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT
  CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci AUTO_INCREMENT=2105417 ;

Notice that the combined is unique: (type=0, product_id, date) or (type=1, script_id, step, date)

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3 Answers 3

Create index for date & id. In where condition put AND p.id IN (1,8,9,10,11) after s.type = 0 i hope it should make your query faster than previous.

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Do you really need to join with mw_brands? You're not using any data from it, so the only use right now is to make sure that the mw_statistics is related (through mw_products) to a mw_brands?

If you don't need it, remove both joins and change out p.id in (1,8,9,10,11) for s.product_id in (1,8,9,10,11).

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Ah.. stupid, those joins were totally unnecessary! I rewrote it to: SELECT (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(s.date)*1000+(3600000)) as time, ROUND((s.loadtime / s.loadtimeMeasurements), 3) as loadtime FROM mw_statistics s WHERE s.type = 1 AND s.date >= '2013-02-01 07:52:05' AND s.date <= '2013-02-01 11:52:05' AND s.product_id IN (1,8,9,10,11) GROUP BY s.date However, it still takes ~1 seconds to complete. I also added an index on "date", but the field isn't unique. The table has statistic records on a date per type/script_id or type/product_id combination. Any more suggestions? –  symfoon Feb 1 '13 at 10:56

To be completely sure of the reasons, I'd need the execution plan (obtained with EXPLAIN).

In a pinch, I'd guess there's one or more full table scans involved, due to improper/missing indexes.

You want an INDEX on mw_statistics based on type, date, product_id in this order:

 CREATE INDEX mw_ndx ON mw_statistics ( type, date, product_id )

You could also try moving the condition on p.id to s:

WHERE s.type = 0
    AND s.date >= '2013-02-01 06:12:32' AND s.date <= '2013-02-01 10:12:30'
    AND s.product_id IN (1,8,9,10,11)

...in which case your index would probably perform better like this:

 CREATE INDEX mw_ndx ON mw_statistics ( type, product_id, date )

A closer look

You have a column called date, yet you range it using a datetime, and group on it, without any aggregate functions. It might be the case that you always want to query a single day, and the GROUP BY is then superfluous. If the column held a datetime, you would have very granular (probably useless) groups of very few items, in most cases a single one.

Then, all the data you're loading in comes from the s table. You might be better served by implementing constraints on product_id to make sure that statistics do have a product and the latter does have a brand.

You could also check beforehand whether the product_ids are legit in this regard. When this is done, your query boils down to

SELECT 
    (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(date)*1000+3600000) as time,
    ROUND((loadtime / loadtimeMeasurements), 3) as loadtime
FROM mw_statistics
WHERE type = 0
    AND product_id IN (1,8,9,10,11)
    AND date BETWEEN '2013-02-01 06:12:32' AND '2013-02-01 10:12:30'
;

which, indexed on type, product_id and date, ought to run in tens of milliseconds.

Specific attempt

CREATE INDEX mw_ndx ON mw_statistics (
          type, product_id, date, loadtime, loadtimeMeasurements
     );

SELECT
    (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(date)*1000+3600000) as time,
    ROUND((loadtime / loadtimeMeasurements), 3) as loadtime
FROM mw_statistics
WHERE type = 0
  AND product_id IN (1,8,9,10,11)
  AND date BETWEEN '2013-02-01 06:12:32' AND '2013-02-01 10:12:30'
;

This way, the necessary records are quickly whittled down by exact selection on type and set selection on product_id. The date selection also ought to perform well; in another situation you might want to consider partitioning or sharding, but with less than a few million records it just doesn't smell worthwhile. Every index entry is weighed with two smallints, but by accepting this small overhead, you actually never access the main table at all.

Query runtime will depend on column cardinality; but on a sample, evenly (actually randomly) populated sample table with one million rows, I'm getting round-trip times between 8 and 90 milliseconds, depending on cache performances and number of rows actually retrieved.

For a more precise tuning I'd need the output of EXPLAIN SELECT (UNIX_TIMESTAMP....

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Thanks for your help, i updated the question with a table structure and some notes on the "unique" fields. Any suggestion for a (better) index? –  symfoon Feb 1 '13 at 11:17
    
Yes, try the 'specific attempt' recipe. Create the index and run the query, see how it goes. –  lserni Feb 1 '13 at 11:57
    
You'll have to edit it into the question, it's probably too long as a comment. –  lserni Feb 1 '13 at 12:04
    
Thanks for the help so far.. But could you rewrite the index? I have queries for loadtime, but also for the other 'statistics' like content(Errors), application(Errors), etc. So i guess an index on loadtime won't work? Explain now says: | 1 | SIMPLE | s | range | IDX_FC665E6FA1C01850,mw_ndx | IDX_FC665E6FA1C01850 | 5 | NULL | 31600 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort | Please notice that the combined is unique: (type=0, product_id, date) or (type=1, script_id, step, date), but the other fields are not –  symfoon Feb 1 '13 at 12:15
    
The index on loadtime would, of course, only cover the queries with loadtime. But to have indexes for all fields would, overall, cost the same as not having cover indexes at all. I'd suggest checking what query is the most used, and what WHERE columns are the more often used, and build one or two indexes accordingly. Better one index with two fields, helping maybe three queries, than one index with three fields that would help more -- but one query only. You need performance statistics to help you decide. –  lserni Feb 1 '13 at 22:15

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