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I have a code where i am executing a command on remote Linux machine and reading the output using Paramiko. The code def looks like this:

ssh = paramiko.SSHClient()
ssh.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy())
ssh.connect(IPAddress, username=user['username'], password=user['password'])


chan = self.ssh.get_transport().open_session()

chan.settimeout(10800)

try:
    # Execute thecommand
    chan.exec_command(cmd)

    contents = StringIO.StringIO()

    data = chan.recv(1024)

    # Capturing data from chan buffer.
    while data:
        contents.write(data)
        data = chan.recv(1024)

except socket.timeout:
    raise socket.timeout


output = contents.getvalue()

return output,chan.recv_stderr(600),chan.recv_exit_status()

The above code works for small outputs, but it gets stuck for larger outputs.

Is there any buffer related issue in here?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

i see no problem related to stdout channel, but i'm not sure about the way you are handling stderr. Can you confirm, its not the stderr capturing thats causing problem? I'll try out your code and let you know.

Update: when a command you execute gives lots of messages in STDERR, your code freezes. I'm not sure why, but recv_stderr(600) might be the reason. So capture error stream the same way you capture standard output. something like,

contents_err = StringIO.StringIO()

data_err = chan.recv_stderr(1024)
while data_err:
    contents_err.write(data_err)
    data_err = chan.recv_stderr(1024)

you may even first try and change recv_stderr(600) to recv_stderr(1024) or higher.

share|improve this answer
    
I ran the code for stdout. Wow it worked. But its not working for stderr. – vipulb Feb 8 '13 at 11:33

I am posting the final code which worked with inputs from Bruce Wayne( :) )

ssh = paramiko.SSHClient()
ssh.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy())
ssh.connect(IPAddress, username=user['username'], password=user['password'])


chan = self.ssh.get_transport().open_session()

chan.settimeout(10800)



try:
    # Execute the given command
    chan.exec_command(cmd)

    # To capture Data. Need to read the entire buffer to caputure output

    contents = StringIO.StringIO()
    error = StringIO.StringIO()

    while not chan.exit_status_ready():

        if chan.recv_ready():
                data = chan.recv(1024)
                #print "Indside stdout"
                while data:
                    contents.write(data)
                    data = chan.recv(1024)


        if chan.recv_stderr_ready():

                error_buff = chan.recv_stderr(1024)
                while error_buff:
                    error.write(error_buff)
                    error_buff = chan.recv_stderr(1024)


     exist_status = chan.recv_exit_status()


except socket.timeout:
  raise socket.timeout


output = contents.getvalue()
error_value = error.getvalue()


return output,error_value,exist_status
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that recv_ready() is true as soon as exit_status_ready() is true, right? I've seen cases where exit_status_ready() is true, but recv_ready() is not yet true, even though it has output eventually (i.e. if I manually block before reading it with 'while not stdout.channel.recv_ready(): pass'. The problem with that approach is that if there is NOT going to be any data, it gets stuck in an infinite wait loop. Is there a better way to do this? – David Doria May 7 '14 at 15:03
    
Yes i have encountered the same problem. So what i did was i am checking for chan.exit_status_ready() before the while loop. – vipulb May 12 '14 at 9:52
    
I don't understand - you just check exit_status_ready() once before the loop? How does that determine if recv_ready() is ever going to return? Can you please post a code snippet? – David Doria May 12 '14 at 12:57
    
ohh ok. I didn't try your scenario. I just reviewed my code. I actually never check for recv_ready(). I just check chan.exit_status_ready(), thats it. My code works fine. – vipulb May 19 '14 at 14:58
    
Be careful, chan.exit_status_ready() indicates that the remote proc finished but not that you finished reading the input buffers. That said, you might end up with no data if your code runs slow (or you just input a time.sleep(5) before the loop) as the channel signals that the remote proc finished and you just stopped reading. I'd suggest to check for: chan.exit_status_ready() and not recv_ready() and not recv_stderr_ready() for the loop condition followed by a chan.read() at the end to get any leftovers from the buffers. – tintin Sep 18 '15 at 20:17

Actually I think all above answers can't resolve the real problem:

if the remote program produce large amount of stderr output first then

stdout.readlines()
stderr.readlines()

would hung forever. although

stderr.readlines()
stdout.readlines()

would resolve this case, but it will fail in case the remote program produce large amount of stdout output first.

I don't have a solution yet...

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmmm... Ineresting – vipulb Feb 17 '14 at 12:39

It's easier if you use the high level representation of an open ssh session. Since you already use ssh-client to open your channel, you can just run your command from there, and avoid the extra work.

ssh = paramiko.SSHClient()
ssh.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy())
ssh.connect(IPAddress, username=user['username'], password=user['password'])

stdin, stdout, stderr = ssh.exec_command(cmd)
for line in stdout.readlines():
    print line
for line in stderr.readlines():
    print line

You will need to come back and read from these files handles again if you receive additional data afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually i need to use Transport Session cause i need to check the return code of cmds. – vipulb Feb 12 '13 at 12:46
    
@vipulb ah, that would be a good reason then. – Spencer Rathbun Feb 12 '13 at 13:33
    
@SpencerRathbun Do you not have to check stdout.channel.recv_ready() before using stdout.readlines()? It seems that sometimes readlines() returns nothing when there is definitely supposed to be something on stdout. – David Doria May 7 '14 at 15:01
    
@DavidDoria According to my read of the docs, we are getting a filelike object after the command ran and the streams have come back. We should not need to check, since everything is finished. If this is not correct, it's certainly a surprise to me. – Spencer Rathbun May 7 '14 at 17:03

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