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I am trying to setup my workstation in such a way that tmux is run for each terminal (xterm, gnome-terminal, ...) that is launched. I was thinking to add tmux to the .bashrc; problem is that if I launch bash twice for whatever reason, it start a second tmux inside the current tmux.

So:

  • is there a way to detect, maybe from the .bashrc, that the current bash is the 'first' one and not a second one launched in the same terminal?
  • any other good ideas / best practices / bash design patterns?
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3 Answers 3

You can add the following to your .bash_profile:

SHELL=tmux

This is the first place xterm checks for the command to run if none is given on the command line.

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unfortunately it does not work. Do you have any idea why? I added it both to .bashrc and to .bash_profile. –  francesco stablum Feb 1 '13 at 15:17
    
hmm, actually it seems to work only if xterm is started from a shell that has defined $SHELL as tmux. Interesting... –  francesco stablum Feb 1 '13 at 15:25
1  
Then it's probably time to mention the caveat. If you log into the machine using a graphical login, then you probably don't have a bash shell as the ultimate ancestor of all your processes. It's been a while for me; is there something like .xinitrc or a Gnome/KDE equivalent to which you can add the SHELL=tmux setting? –  chepner Feb 1 '13 at 16:49

Combine the two previous answers:

alias xterm='SHELL=tmux xterm'

You get the desired behavior when starting just xterm, but you can still use xterm for other operations, such as xterm top.

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What about aliasing xterm to xterm tmux?

Just add the following line to your .bashrc:

alias xterm='xterm tmux'
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thanks, but it does not seem a correct solution because I might want to use xterm for purposes that are different than launching a shell. For example xterm top. So, my goal is probably to be able to use tmux as default xterm shell. –  francesco stablum Feb 1 '13 at 10:40
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@francescostablum: So, create a different alias, e.g. xtt. –  choroba Feb 1 '13 at 12:08
    
yes, this might actually be a solution, but I have to define several aliases for all terminal types that I want to use with tmux. –  francesco stablum Feb 1 '13 at 15:23

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