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I've been following SO for a bit now, and I've come across this term POD-type a few times... what does it mean?

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Also see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2293796 –  Lazer Jun 13 '10 at 7:16
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please see chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/message/213026#213026 and the following day's messages for discussion about the accepted answer –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 22 '10 at 10:51
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6 Answers

up vote 215 down vote accepted

POD stands for Plain Old Data - that is, a struct (or class) without constructors, destructors and virtual members functions. Wikipedias article on POD goes into a bit more detail and defines it as:

A Plain Old Data Structure in C++ is an aggregate class that contains only PODS as members, has no user-defined destructor, no user-defined copy assignment operator, and no nonstatic members of pointer-to-member type.

Greater detail can be found in this answer for C++98/03. C++11 changed the rules surrounding POD, relaxing them greatly, thus necessitating a follow-up answer here.

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Hmmm... I guess I prefer more correct technical term of "intrinsic type" to this kind of slang. ;) –  paxos1977 Sep 28 '08 at 18:41
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There's a difference. Intrinsic types are the "builtin" language primitives. POD types are these, plus aggregations of these (and other PODs). –  Adam Wright Sep 28 '08 at 18:44
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POD types have characteristics that non-POD types do not. For example, if you have a global, const, POD-type struct, you can initialize its contents with brace notation, it is put into read-only memory, and no code needs to be generated to initialize it (constructor or otherwise), because it's part of the program image. This is important for embedded folks who often have tight constraints on RAM, ROM, or Flash. –  Mike DeSimone Nov 14 '10 at 18:11
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This is wrong: POD types can have member functions, just not virtual member functions nor constructors or destructors –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 18 '11 at 14:27
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-1 ;( If this is wrong, why not correct it? –  mlvljr Feb 28 '12 at 11:07
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Very informally:

A POD is a type (including classes) where the C++ compiler guarantees that there will be no "magic" going on in the structure: for example hidden pointers to vtables, offsets that get applied to the address when it is cast to other types (at least if the target's POD too), constructors, or destructors. Roughly speaking, a type is a POD when the only things in it are built-in types and combinations of them. The result is something that "acts like" a C type.

Less informally:

  • int, char, wchar_t, bool, float, double are PODs, as are long/short and signed/unsigned versions of them.
  • pointers (including pointer-to-function and pointer-to-member) are PODs,
  • enums are PODs
  • a const or volatile POD is a POD.
  • a class, struct or union of PODs is a POD provided that all non-static data members are public, and it has no base class and no constructors, destructors, or virtual methods. Static members don't stop something being a POD under this rule.
  • Wikipedia is wrong to say that a POD cannot have members of type pointer-to-member. Or rather, it's correct for the C++98 wording, but TC1 made explicit that pointers-to-member are POD.

Formally (C++03 Standard):

3.9(10): "Arithmetic types (3.9.1), enumeration types, pointer types, and pointer to member types (3.9.2) and cv-qualified versions of these types (3.9.3) are collectively caller scalar types. Scalar types, POD-struct types, POD-union types (clause 9), arrays of such types and cv-qualified versions of these types (3.9.3) are collectively called POD types"

9(4): "A POD-struct is an aggregate class that has no non-static data members of type non-POD-struct, non-POD-union (or array of such types) or reference, and has no user-define copy operator and no user-defined destructor. Similarly a POD-union is an aggregate union that has no non-static data members of type non-POD-struct, non-POD-union (or array of such types) or reference, and has no user-define copy operator and no user-defined destructor.

8.5.1(1): "An aggregate is an array or class (clause 9) with no user-declared constructors (12.1), no private or protected non-static data members (clause 11), no base classes (clause 10) and no virtual functions (10.3)."

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You have formal/less formal. You could add rule of thumb. Built in types and aggregations of Built in types (or something like that). In addition to get the exact definition we need to make the knowledge easy to use. –  Loki Astari Sep 28 '08 at 19:58
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You're a bit wrong on the "offsets when cast_to another type" bit. Those offsets are applied when casting to a base or derived class. So, if you cast from a POD base class pointer to a non-POD derived class, you may still encounter an adjustement. –  MSalters Sep 29 '08 at 12:05
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@Lazer: that's a whole other question, "how do PODs behave?" as opposed to "what does POD mean?". In summary the difference relates to initialisation (hence also use of memcpy to duplicate objects), compatibility with C struct layout for that compiler, and pointer up- and down-casting. PODs "act like C types", non-PODs aren't guaranteed to do so. So if you want your type to portably act like a C struct, you must ensure that it is POD, so you need to know the difference. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '10 at 18:13
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If Wikipedia is wrong... shouldn't it be edited? –  muntoo Jun 17 '12 at 0:20
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@muntoo: it has been, really I was commenting on the answer that quotes outdated info from Wikipedia. I could edit that answer, I suppose, but I smell trouble if I go around editing other people's answer to agree with mine, no matter how right I think I am. –  Steve Jessop Jun 17 '12 at 1:45
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Plain Old Data

in short it is all builtin data type (ex: int, char, float, long int, unsigned char, double) and all aggregation of POD data. Yes, it's a recursive definition ;)

To be more clear, a POD is what we call 'a struct'.

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It's true that we sometimes call them 'a struct'. However we're always wrong to do so, since a struct is not necessarily a POD-type. –  Steve Jessop Sep 28 '08 at 19:21
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obviously... struct and class are almost equivalent, but in "the business" we call 'a struct' a simple data collector, usually without ctors and dtor, usually with value semantics... –  ugasoft Sep 28 '08 at 21:52
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As I understand POD (PlainOldData) is just a raw data - it does not need:

  • to be constructed,
  • to be destroyed,
  • to have custom operators.
  • And (I suppose) must not have functions / be a function.

How to check if something is a POD? Well, there is a struct for that called std::is_pod:

namespace std {
// Could use is_standard_layout && is_trivial instead of the builtin.
template<typename _Tp>
  struct is_pod
  : public integral_constant<bool, __is_pod(_Tp)>
  { };
}

(From header type_traits)


Reference:

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Put it that (funny) way

A POD type is a basic type you can compose stuff out of.

So in the real world a POD would be an Atom (you can't split it that easily):

Atom

And you can compose other datatypes with POD's / Atoms.

In C/C++ it are structs, classes, pointertypes, ... and in the real world it is for example a car.

car

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This isn't true, a POD can be basic or it can be complex. I use PODs for large control structures. The practical difference is that I don't need to write a constructor. –  Mikhail Aug 28 '13 at 1:27
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With C++, Plain Old Data doesn't just mean that things like int, char, etc are the only types used. Plain Old Data really means in practice that you can take a struct memcpy it from one location in memory to another and things will work exactly like you would expect (i.e. not blow up). This breaks if your class, or any class your class contains, has as a member that is a pointer or a reference or a class that has a virtual function. Essentially, if pointers have to be involved somewhere, its not Plain Old Data.

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Pointers are allowed in POD structs. References aren't. –  j_random_hacker Feb 12 '09 at 6:37
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