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I have multiple frames, for the purpose suppose 2. Each frame comprises 2 columns - an index column, and a value column

sz<-5;
frame_1<-data.frame(index=sort(sample(1:10,sz,replace=F)),value=rpois(sz,50));
frame_2<-data.frame(index=sort(sample(1:10,sz,replace=F)),value=rpois(sz,50));

frame_1:

 index value
  1    49
  6    62
  7    58
  8    30
 10    50

frame_2:

index value
  4    60
  5    64
  6    48
  7    46
  9    57

The goal is to create a third frame, frame_3, whose indices will be the union of those in frame_1 and frame_2,

frame_3<-data.frame(index = sort(union(frame_1$index,frame_2$index)));

and which will comprise two additional columns, value_1 and value_2.

frame_3$value_1 will be filled out from frame_1$value, frame_3$value_2 will be filled out from frame_2$value;

These should be filled out like so: frame_3:

index value_1 value_2
1      49       NA
4      49       60     # value_1 is filled through with previous value
5      49       64     # value_1 is filled through with previous value
6      62       48     
7      58       46   
8      30       46     # value_2 is filled through with previous value
9      30       57     # value_1 is filled through with previous value
10     50       57     # value_1 is filled through with previous value

i'm looking for an efficient solution, as im dealing with records in the hundreds of thousands

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1  
(+1) very nicely framed. One small suggestion. Use a set.seed(.) so that pasting your code produces the same output. In this case, I used your table. –  Arun Feb 1 '13 at 13:09
    
@Arun yup, next time; thanks –  Aditya Sihag Feb 1 '13 at 13:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This problem screams for data.table. You can use a loop to recursively construct columns one by one using x[y, roll=TRUE].

require(data.table)
dt1 <- data.table(frame_1)
dt2 <- data.table(frame_2)
setkey(dt1, index)
setkey(dt2, index)
dt3 <- data.table(index = sort(unique(c(dt1$index, dt2$index))))
> dt1[dt2[dt3, roll=TRUE], roll=TRUE]

#    index value value.1
# 1:     1    49      NA
# 2:     4    49      60
# 3:     5    49      64
# 4:     6    62      48
# 5:     7    58      46
# 6:     8    30      46
# 7:     9    30      57
# 8:    10    50      57
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks –  Aditya Sihag Feb 1 '13 at 11:52
2  
+1 Are you sure it is the problem that screams for data.table ? :) –  juba Feb 1 '13 at 11:53
    
:) okay okay, maybe not. –  Arun Feb 1 '13 at 11:55

If your data.frames aren't very large, you can just use merge combined with zoo::na.locf.

R> library(zoo)
R> frame_3 <- merge(frame_1, frame_2, by="index",
+                  all=TRUE, suffixes=paste(".",1:2,sep=""))
R > (frame_3 <- na.locf(frame_3))
  index value.1 value.2
1     1      49      NA
2     4      49      60
3     5      49      64
4     6      62      48
5     7      58      46
6     8      30      46
7     9      30      57
8    10      50      57

Or, just use zoo objects to begin with, assuming your "value" columns are all one type (like a matrix, you can't mix types in zoo objects).

R> z1 <- zoo(frame_1$value, frame_1$index)
R> z2 <- zoo(frame_2$value, frame_2$index)
R> (z3 <- na.locf(merge(z1, z2)))
   z1 z2
1  49 NA
4  49 60
5  49 64
6  62 48
7  58 46
8  30 46
9  30 57
10 50 57
share|improve this answer
    
this does the job too, but I'm curious why you qualified your answer with if the data frames aren't too large –  Aditya Sihag Feb 2 '13 at 18:04
    
@AdityaSihag: because data.table objects are faster and more efficient than data.frames. By the way, "large" is 1-million-plus rows and 20+ columns. –  Joshua Ulrich Feb 2 '13 at 18:09

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