Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found really good example how to add new method to the class dynamically (transplant class):

def say(host, msg):
   print '%s says %s' % (host.name, msg)

def funcToMethod(func, clas, method_name=None):
   setattr(clas, method_name or func.__name__, func)

class transplant:
   def __init__(self, method, host, method_name=None):
      self.host = host
      self.method = method
      setattr(host, method_name or method.__name__, self)

   def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
      nargs = [self.host]
      nargs.extend(args)
      return apply(self.method, nargs, kwargs)

class Patient:
   def __init__(self, name):
      self.name = name

if __name__ == '__main__':
   jimmy = Patient('Jimmy')
   transplant(say, jimmy, 'say1')
   funcToMethod(say, jimmy, 'say2')

   jimmy.say1('Hello')
   jimmy.say2(jimmy, 'Good Bye!')

But I don't understand, how to modify it for adding static methods. Can someone help me?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "static" method? –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 1 '13 at 11:34
    
@JoachimPileborg: the @staticmethod decorator. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 1 '13 at 11:35
    
And by the way, you don't add the functions to the class, you add them to an instance of the class. If you replace jimmy in the calls with the actual class Patient then you add methods to the class. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 1 '13 at 11:35
    
@JoachimPileborg: for a staticmethod to work it has to be added to the class; it's a descriptor. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 1 '13 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

All you need to do is wrap the function in a staticmethod() call:

say = staticmethod(say)

or apply it as a decorator to the function definition:

@staticmethod
def say(host, msg):
    # ...

which comes down to the same thing.

Just remember; the @decorator syntax is just syntactic sugar for writing target = decorator(target), where target is the decorated object.

share|improve this answer

I don't see a staticmethod here. The say function is expecting two arguments, and the first argument, host, appears to be the instance of the class.

So it seems like you are simply trying to attach a new method to a class. That can be done without funcToMethod or transplant:

def say(self, msg):
   print '%s says %s' % (self.name, msg)

class Patient:
   def __init__(self, name):
      self.name = name

if __name__ == '__main__':
   jimmy = Patient('Jimmy')
   Patient.say = say
   jimmy.say('Hello')

yields

Jimmy says Hello

If you did want to attach a staticmethod, then, as MartijnPieters answered, use the staticmethod decorator:

def tell(msg):
   print(msg)

if __name__ == '__main__':
   jimmy = Patient('Jimmy')
   Patient.tell = staticmethod(tell)
   jimmy.tell('Goodbye')

yields

Goodbye

The above shows how new methods can be attached to a class without funcToMethod or transplant. Both funcToMethod and transplant try to attach functions to instances of the class rather than the class itself. This is wrong-headed, which is why it requires contortions (like having to pass jimmy as an argument in jimmy.say2(jimmy, 'Good Bye!')) to make it work. Methods should be defined on the class (e.g. Patient), not on the instance (e.g. jimmy).

transplant is particularly horrible. It uses a class when a function would suffice. It uses the archaic apply instead of the modern self.method(*nargs, **kwargs) syntax, and ignores the PEP8 convention for camelCasing class names. In its defense, it was written over ten years ago. But fundamentally, what makes it an anathema to good programming is that you just don't need it.

share|improve this answer

Well the following works, ie puts a static method on Patient which I think the OP was wanting.

def tell(msg):
   print(msg)

...

funcToMethod(tell, Patient, 'say3')

...

Patient.say3('Bye!')
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.