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I have a string of IDs in CSV format in an input box

12,23,26,32

I have to check if this string contains 23 or 24, if yes then return false, else return true

share|improve this question
    
All the answers to this point are quite limited, assuming that you'll only ever need to check for 23 or 24. If you need it, you might get a more reusable/flexible answer if you rephrase the question :) – Matt Sach Feb 1 '13 at 11:54
    
Note that Internet Explorer < 9 does not support indexOf on arrays. – MikeM Feb 1 '13 at 22:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use indexOf. You can check if it contains a subString. If not found, it returns -1

var str = "12,23,26,32"
return !(str.indexOf("23")!=-1 || str.indexOf("24")!=-1) // Dont have 23 or 24

=======EDIT=======

Like @Matt said in comment, this solution will work also to "12,239,26,32" and thats not the point.

Make the split before check the indexOf, then you will get the element between the commas.

var array = "12,23,26,32".split(",");
return !(array.indexOf("23")!=-1 || array.indexOf("24")!=-1) // Dont have 23 or 24
share|improve this answer
2  
The trouble is, that will match if the input string is "12,239,26,32". I think the OP wanted each csv of the input string to be an atomic unit to test against. – Matt Sach Feb 1 '13 at 11:47
    
I see... You have a point. A solution is make a split before checking, right? I edited my answer – Felipe Fonseca Feb 1 '13 at 11:50
!/(^|,)2[34](,|$)/.test( str );

or if there may be whitespace present

!/(^|,)\s*2[34]\s*(,|$)/.test( str );

The RegExp test method returns true if the string argument matches the regular expression or false if it doesn't. The ! inverts the result of the test call.

^ is the metacharacter for the start of the string, so(^|,) means either 'at the start of the string' or 'one comma character'.

It can't be written [^,] as that would mean 'one character that isn't a comma', and it can't be written [,^] as that means 'one character that is either a comma or a literal ^ character.

2[34] means 2 followed by 3 or 4.
(,|$) means a comma or the end $ of the string.
\s* means zero or more space characters.

share|improve this answer
if (/(?:^|,)(23|24)(?:,|$)/.test("12,23,26,32")) {
   /* found 23 or 24 */
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

var str = "12,23,26,32";

var isFound = (str.indexOf('23') || str.indexOf('24')) > -1;
share|improve this answer
1  
The trouble is, that will match if the input string is "12,239,26,32". I think the OP wanted each csv of the input string to be an atomic unit to test against. – Matt Sach Feb 1 '13 at 11:49
    
Oh yeah, for that it won't work. I got that wrong i guess – Varinder Singh Feb 1 '13 at 11:51
var str = "12,23,26,32";

var obj = str.split(",");

var isFound = false;

for(i=0; i < obj.length; i++)
{
     if(obj[i] == "23" || obj[i] == "24")
     {
          isFound = true;
          break;
     }
}
return isFound;
share|improve this answer
    
-1, should always specify the radix on parseInt. Also, why convert to a number and then compare it? – Evan Trimboli Feb 1 '13 at 11:47
    
+1, it's closer to what the OP probably wants than any of the indexOf or regex answers. – Matt Sach Feb 1 '13 at 11:50
    
@EvanTrimboli, Can you explain this? should always specify the radix on the string – DON Feb 1 '13 at 11:51
1  
parseInt() takes two parameters, the string to parse and the "base" (technically called the radix) of the number system to parse to (10 for decimal, 8 for octal, etc.). If not specified, javascript will assume based on the string format, and thus parseInt('032') will likely be assumed to be octal. – Matt Sach Feb 1 '13 at 11:53
    
@MattSach thanks, and i made the comparison to string – DON Feb 1 '13 at 11:54

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