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I observed a strange behaviour of the __future__ module's print_function in Python 3.2.

Take, for example this code:

from __future__ import print_function
import sys

print('Enter the base path of the images: ', end='')
path = sys.stdin.readline().strip().strip('"')
if len(path) == 0:
    print("No path entered")
else:
    print(root)
print("\n\nPress ENTER to exit")
exit = sys.stdin.readline()

When the script is run, it appears the console waits for the user to press ENTER before displaying the first print statement.
The output then looks like this:


Enter the base path of the images: No path entered


Press ENTER to exit

Needless to day, displaying an empty prompt to the user leads to a lot of confusion especially since a lot of people are afraid of the black window with white text (Command Prompt).

When the code is changed to this

from __future__ import print_function
import sys

print('\nEnter the base path of the images: ', end='') #line now starts with \n
path = sys.stdin.readline().strip().strip('"')
if len(path) == 0:
    print("No path entered")
else:
    print(path)
print("\n\nPress ENTER to exit")
exit = sys.stdin.readline()

Then the output is as expected (assuming we ignore the preceding empty line):


Enter the base path of the images: c:\
c:\


Press ENTER to exit

When the code is run in python 2.6 however, the first one works as expected (i.e. it displays Enter the base path of the images: before waiting to receive input).

This leads me to ask:
Why do I need to precede the print function with a \n in order to get an output displayed in Python 3.2 while I don't need the \n when running in Python 2.6?
Could it be that the print_function is implemented differently in the two versions?

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1  
Is there a reason you're using sys.stdin.readline() instead of input? Presumably for python2.x compatability? –  mgilson Feb 1 '13 at 13:00
    
input in Python 2 attempts to evaluate anything typed, (not what I want). In Python 3, it just captures the input (what I want). raw_input captures the input (what I want) but it only works in Python 2, not 3 so it's inconvenient. Using sys.stdin.readline() allows me to use the same function call in both versions. –  Alex Essilfie Feb 1 '13 at 17:44
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are seeing the effects of line buffering. Flush stdout first (using sys.stdout.flush() for backwards compatibility with Python 2):

print('Enter the base path of the images: ', end='')
sys.stdout.flush()

The print() function in Python 2 is certainly different from the one in Python 3 (where the from __future__ import print_function line is effectively meaningless). In Python 3, I/O has been overhauled and stdout buffering semantics have changed subtly. In Python 2, the sys.stdin.readline() call flushes stdout automatically, in Python 3 this is no longer the case.

If you use the input() function instead of reading from stdin directly, you do not need to flush at all:

msg = 'Enter the base path of the images: '
try:
    # python 2
    path = raw_input(msg)
except NameError:
    # python 3
    path = input(msg)
share|improve this answer
    
This is the solution I worked out too -- Except I LBYL -- if sys.version_info < (3,): input = raw_input ... I'm shadowing the builtin input that way -- but I'm not too bent out of shape about that one ;-) –  mgilson Feb 1 '13 at 13:07
    
Python 3 doesn't entirely ignore the future import: it will still bind the name 'print_function' in the current scope to the imported value. There's just no magic meaning assigned to that import in Python 3. –  Duncan Feb 1 '13 at 13:34
    
@Duncan: Did I miss out the word "effectively" again did I? :-P –  Martijn Pieters Feb 1 '13 at 13:37
    
Since calling input (or raw_input in Python 2) flushes the output buffer, I reassigned the input function to a common one based on the version of python running like so if sys.version_info[0] == 2: input = raw_input. Now I call a single function to flush and collect input from the user irrespective of the version of python executing the script. –  Alex Essilfie Feb 1 '13 at 20:44
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In this case, I'd check my python version and substitute the appropriate "input" function: Now you can just use input wherever you want user interaction.

from __future__ import print_function
import sys

if sys.version_info < (3,):
    input = raw_input

path = input('Enter the base path of the images> ').strip().strip('"')
if len(path) == 0:
    print("No path entered")
else:
    print(path)

print("\n\nPress ENTER to exit")
exit = input()
share|improve this answer
    
And as a side note, with the code posted above, you no longer even need the future import -- Making this code work with MUCH older python versions than even 2.6. -- Maybe back as far as python2.0 ... –  mgilson Feb 1 '13 at 13:11
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