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Is there a module for Python to open IBM SPSS (i.e. .sav) files? It would be great if there's something up-to-date which doesn't require any additional dll files/libraries.

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possible duplicate of Exporting to SPSS files in Python Django? If you want there is also a recipe on active-state –  Bakuriu Feb 1 '13 at 13:09
    
Hi, Bakuriu. It's not a duplicate, as I'm not referencing the Django framework, I'm talking about opening, as opposed to exporting/writing a file, and I mentioned the preference for something recent which doesn't require external libraries/dlls. There's some common ground between the questions, but they can elicit different, as well as similar, responses. Thanks for the link, but again, I'm trying to avoid dll files, if possible. –  Lamps1829 Feb 1 '13 at 17:23
    
The other answer cites Django, but it actually has nothing to do with it. Since Exporting requires the ability to write a file, the chances that you can also read it are high. Reading around I strongly believe you have only one choice: use the .dll released by IBM. I can't find any open specification for that file format, which means that the only way to read those file is to use IBM's libraries. You can always try to reverse-engineer the format, but that would take much more time and effort. –  Bakuriu Feb 2 '13 at 8:14
    
Thanks, Bakuriu. It's unfortunate, but as you said, it is looking likely that IBM's .dll release is the thing to use. –  Lamps1829 Feb 2 '13 at 12:53

4 Answers 4

Depending on what you want to do--process data using R-related commands from rpy2, or switch to Python--the solution provided by @Spacedman on a related thread might easily be adapted to suit your needs.

Otherwise, Pandas includes a convenient wrapper for rpy2. Here is an example of use with Peat and Barton's weights.sav data set:

>>> import pandas.rpy.common as com
>>> filename = "weights.sav"
>>> w = com.robj.r('foreign::read.spss("%s", to.data.frame=TRUE)' % filename)
>>> w = com.convert_robj(w)
>>> w.head()
     ID  WEIGHT  LENGTH  HEADC  GENDER  EDUCATIO              PARITY
1  L001    3.95    55.5   37.5  Female  tertiary  3 or more siblings
2  L003    4.63    57.0   38.5  Female  tertiary           Singleton
3  L004    4.75    56.0   38.5    Male    year12          2 siblings
4  L005    3.92    56.0   39.0    Male  tertiary         One sibling
5  L006    4.56    55.0   39.5    Male    year10          2 siblings
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Perhaps you may find this useful: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/577811-python-reader-writer-for-spss-sav-files-linux-mac-/

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Thanks, SM, but that module requires an additional dll file, and that's something I'm trying to avoid. Is there a module (preferably one that is recent) that contains all of the necessary functionality without the use of external libraries? –  Lamps1829 Feb 1 '13 at 13:28
    
Not one I'd know about or was able to find using google, sorry. Why is using external library something you cant live with? I suppose you use a lot of them on a daily basis, wether its Python or anything else, inclusing OS. –  SpankMe Feb 1 '13 at 13:31
    
I wouldn't exclude the possibility of using a dll if other options are exhausted, but it's something I'd like to avoid if possible. The less dependencies, the cleaner things are, and the lower the chances for things going wrong. –  Lamps1829 Feb 1 '13 at 13:43

But the benefit of using the IBM libraries is that they get this rather complex binary file format right. They are free, relieve you of the burden of writing code for this format, and the license permits you to redistribute them. What more could you ask?

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You could use a python interface to R and then import the data using read.spss in library(foreign).

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