Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this raster file and I want to rescale the y axis (frequency) to [0,1](by dividing the frequency by the sum of all frequencies).

conne <- file("C:\\fined.bin","rb")
sd<- readBin(conne, numeric(), size=4,  n=1440*720, signed=TRUE)
y<-t(matrix((data=sd), ncol=1440, nrow=720))
r = raster(y)
hist(r, breaks=30, main="SMD_2010",
        xlab="Pearson correlation", ylab="Frequency", xlim=c(-1,1))

example:


        values  frequency        (rescaled by dividing each frequency by the sum(85600))
          -1    0                       0
        -0.5    100               0.001168224
           0    38000                 0.443925234
         0.5    7500                  0.087616822
        0.75    40000                 0.46728972

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps use density( ) around your data. –  PascalvKooten Feb 1 '13 at 14:04
    
How to use it ? –  Barry Feb 1 '13 at 14:18
    
Use: hist(..., probability = TRUE) –  cafe876 Feb 1 '13 at 14:31
    
cafe876: but the range will be from 0 to 2.5 not from 0 to 1 –  Barry Feb 1 '13 at 14:34
    
ok, then maybe something like: hist_temp <- hist(...); plot(hist_temp$counts/sum(hist_temp$counts), type = "s") –  cafe876 Feb 1 '13 at 14:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One solution is to save the histogram os object. If you look on structure of this object you can see that heights of histogram bars are stored in element counts.

r<-sample(1:25000,1000)
hist.ob <- hist(r)
str(hist.ob)
List of 7
 $ breaks     : num [1:14] 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 18000 ...
 $ counts     : int [1:13] 75 46 72 91 71 91 74 87 86 82 ...
 $ intensities: num [1:13] 3.75e-05 2.30e-05 3.60e-05 4.55e-05 3.55e-05 4.55e-05 3.70e-05 4.35e-05 4.30e-05 4.10e-05 ...
 $ density    : num [1:13] 3.75e-05 2.30e-05 3.60e-05 4.55e-05 3.55e-05 4.55e-05 3.70e-05 4.35e-05 4.30e-05 4.10e-05 ...
 $ mids       : num [1:13] 1000 3000 5000 7000 9000 11000 13000 15000 17000 19000 ...
 $ xname      : chr "r"
 $ equidist   : logi TRUE
 - attr(*, "class")= chr "histogram"

To transform your data so that sum of all bar heights will be 1, you have to divide the each number with the sum of counts number. Then use plot() function to get the new plot.

hist.ob$counts<-hist.ob$counts/sum(hist.ob$counts)
plot(hist.ob)
share|improve this answer
    
yes this worked but the reason behind rescaling is better comparison ,so all values should be divided by the sum of all values?.And not necessary to reach one(1).Is it possible to just replace max by sum? –  Barry Feb 1 '13 at 16:06
    
then the values ranges from 0 to 0.06 which is not right! would you please use the file attached in question and test it? –  Barry Feb 1 '13 at 16:44
    
@Barry Dividing by sum() will change the range. So the dividing by maximal value will keep range 0-1. If this not the solution you need then please update your question to explain more what you mean by scale y axis. –  Didzis Elferts Feb 1 '13 at 16:59
    
I did update with an example –  Barry Feb 1 '13 at 17:23
    
@Barry - checked with your sample data - if you use sum(hist.ob$counts), then the total sum of heights will be 1. In my sample data all values were quite similar so you saw so small values after transformation. –  Didzis Elferts Feb 1 '13 at 17:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.