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I need to browse items of a treeview, without using recursion, for performance reasons.

TTreeview provides GlobalCount and ItemByGlobalIndex methods, but it only returns visible items
I searched the root class code without finding a private list of all nodes, FGlobalItems seems to only holds items that need to be rendered

Is there a way to sequentially browse all items (including not visible and collapsed nodes) of a treeview?

This question applies to Delphi XE3 / FM2

Thanks,

[Edit Feb 3]
I accepted the default answer (not possible out of the box), despite I was looking for a way to patch the firemonkey treeview on this aspect.
After more analysis, I found out that the FGlobalItems list only holds expanded items and is maintained in the method TCustomTreeView.UpdateGlobalIndexes;
Commenting line 924 of FMX.TreeView (if AItem.IsExpanded then...) leads to building a full index of nodes, and allows to browse all nodes sequentially using ItemByGlobalIndex(), BUT could lead to other performance issues and bugs...
Without any more clue, I'll keep my recursive code.

share|improve this question
1  
I doubt very much that what you ask for can be done. The design of FMX is that every control can parent any other control. So you just need to iterate over the children just like any other control. Why would the framework maintain a linear version of the tree structure in parallel to the recursive version. – David Heffernan Feb 1 '13 at 14:51
4  
What makes you think avoiding recursion improves performance? – jachguate Feb 1 '13 at 15:17
    
@jachguate: You avoid the cost of calls with parameters stacking and local variable create/destroy, for each browsed node. Checked with previous commercial code on large trees. – user315561 Feb 2 '13 at 14:09
    
@David: On VCL side, dev expree tree for example maintains an internal list of nodes. With the FMX treeview, a sequential list is also maintained, but only for visible nodes. Why should it maintain it: even if not required, having a raw collection of items, and separate data reflecting the hierarchical structure seems a good design. – user315561 Feb 2 '13 at 14:12
    
VCL is completely different. Forget all about VCL. – David Heffernan Feb 2 '13 at 14:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here are my functions for walking a treeview in a non-recursive manner. Simple to use if you have a node and want to move to the next or previous one without having to walk the entire tree.

GetNextItem functions by looking at it's first child, or if no children, looking at it's parent for the next child after itself (and going further through parents as necessary).

GetPrevItem looks at the parent to find the previous item, and uses GetLastChild to find the last child of that item (which does use recursion, BTW).

Note that the code as written only walk Expanded nodes, but can easily be modified to walk all nodes (just remove references to IsExpanded).

function GetLastChild(Item: TTreeViewItem): TTreeViewItem;
begin
  if (Item.IsExpanded) and (Item.Count > 0) then
    Result := GetLastChild(Item.Items[Item.Count-1])
  else
    Result := Item;
end;

function GetNextItem(Item: TTreeViewItem): TTreeViewItem;
var ItemParent: TTreeViewItem;
  I: Integer;
  TreeViewParent: TTreeView;
  Parent: TFMXObject;
  Child: TFMXObject;
begin
  if Item = nil then
    Result := nil
  else if (Item.IsExpanded) and (Item.Count > 0) then
    Result := Item.Items[0]
  else
  begin
    Parent := Item.Parent;
    Child := Item;
    while (Parent <> nil) and not (Parent is TTreeView) do
    begin
      while (Parent <> nil) and not (Parent is TTreeView) and not (Parent is TTreeViewItem) do
        Parent := Parent.Parent;

      if (Parent <> nil) and (Parent is TTreeViewItem) then
      begin
        ItemParent := TTreeViewItem(Parent);
        I := 0;
        while (I < ItemParent.Count) and (ItemParent.Items[I] <> Child) do
          inc(I);
        inc(I);
        if I < ItemParent.Count then
        begin
          Result := ItemParent.Items[I];
          EXIT;
        end;
        Child := Parent;
        Parent := Parent.Parent
      end;
    end;

    if (Parent <> nil) and (Parent is TTreeView) then
    begin
      TreeViewParent := TTreeView(Parent);
      I := 0;
      while (I < TreeViewParent.Count) and (TreeViewParent.Items[I] <> Item) do
        inc(I);
      inc(I);
      if I < TreeViewParent.Count then
        Result := TreeViewParent.Items[I]
      else
      begin
        Result := Item;
        EXIT;
      end;
    end
    else
      Result := Item
  end
end;

function GetPrevItem(Item: TTreeViewItem): TTreeViewItem;
var Parent: TFMXObject;
  ItemParent: TTreeViewItem;
  TreeViewParent: TTreeView;
  I: Integer;
begin
  if Item = nil then
    Result := nil
  else
  begin
    Parent := Item.Parent;
    while (Parent <> nil) and not (Parent is TTreeViewItem) and not (Parent is TTreeView) do
      Parent := Parent.Parent;

    if (Parent <> nil) and (Parent is TTreeViewItem) then
    begin
      ItemParent := TTreeViewItem(Parent);
      I := 0;
      while (I < ItemParent.Count) and (ItemParent.Items[I] <> Item) do
        inc(I);
      dec(I);
      if I >= 0 then
        Result := GetLastChild(ItemParent.Items[I])
      else
        Result := ItemParent;
    end
    else if (Parent <> nil) and (Parent is TTreeView) then
    begin
      TreeViewParent := TTreeView(Parent);
      I := 0;
      while (I < TreeViewParent.Count) and (TreeViewParent.Items[I] <> Item) do
        inc(I);
      dec(I);
      if I >= 0 then
        Result := GetLastChild(TreeViewParent.Items[I])
      else
        Result := Item
    end
    else
      Result := Item;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, interesting approach – user315561 Feb 3 '13 at 12:36

The question essentially asks how to traverse a tree without recursion. There are many ways to traverse a tree; the fact that your tree happens to be represented with nodes in a visual control is irrelevant.

For some algorithms, it's easier to think of the traversal in recursive terms. That way, you let the programming language keep track of where in the tree you are by keeping the currently active node as an argument on the stack. If you don't want to use recursion, then you simply have to keep track of the progress yourself. Common tools for that include stacks and queues.

A preorder traversal means that when you visit a node, you do your action on that node's data before doing the action on the node's children. It corresponds to visiting each node of a tree-view control from top to bottom. You could implement it like this with a stack:

procedure PreorderVisit(Node: TTreeNode; Action: TNodeAction);
var
  Worklist: TStack<TTreeNode>;
  i: Integer;
begin
  Worklist := TStack<TTreeNode>.Create;
  try
    Worklist.Push(Node);
    repeat
      Node := Worklist.Pop;
      for i := Pred(Node.Items.Count) downto 0 do
        Worklist.Push(Node.Items[i]);
      Action(Node);
    until Worklist.Empty;
  finally
    Worklist.Free;
  end;
end;

Push the children onto the stack in reverse order so they'll be popped off in the desired order.

In that code, Action stands for whatever task you need to do with each node. You can either use it as specified in the code, as an external function, or you can write a specialized version of PreorderVisit that includes the task-specific code.

TTreeView doesn't actually represent a tree, though. It's really a forest (a collection of trees). That's because there is no single node that represents the root. You can easily use the function above to process all the nodes in a tree, though:

procedure PreorderVisitTree(Tree: TTreeView; Action: TNodeAction);
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to Pred(Tree.Items.Count) do
    PreorderVisit(Tree.Items[i], Action);
end;

Another way of doing a preorder traversal that takes advantage of the specific structure of TTreeView is to use the built-in GetNext method of each node:

procedure PreorderVisitTree(Tree: TTreeView; Action: TNodeAction);
var
  Node: TTreeNode;
begin
  if Tree.Items.Count = 0 then
    exit;
  Node := Tree.Items[0];
  repeat
    Action(Node);
    Node := Node.GetNext;
  until not Assigned(Node);
end;

There appears to be no way of getting hidden nodes of a Firemonkey tree view. You might find better results by iterating over your internal tree data structure instead of trying to extract information from the GUI.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I'm afraid that managing manually a stack instead of letting the compiler do it for us has no added value, at least for performance constraints. Regarding your second proposal, TTreeViewItem does not have a GetNext method (my question is related to firemonkey) – user315561 Feb 2 '13 at 14:19
    
The compiler never does anything for you related to visual controls. That is always in library code. Whether that is written by you, or is part of FMX likely makes little difference to performance. Would you accept an answer that says that FMX does not have the functionality you are asking for? – David Heffernan Feb 2 '13 at 21:18
    
@David: The compiler generates code to push parameters to the stack. When you use recursion, this code is executed. Rob's proposal is to rewrite what the compiler does, but with our own code, using the Worklist instead of the stack&heap. This has nothing to do with FMX and I never wrote it. I see that FMX seems to not have the functionality out of the box. I was asking for any workaround through class helper or even direct update of FMX code... – user315561 Feb 3 '13 at 8:40
    
So now you are saying that you don't mind using recursion? You are saying that recursion is fine so long as the stack used is the thread stack rather than a user-defined stack. The thing is you asked for non-recursive solution, and Rob has given the only possible non-recursive solution. Perhaps you could tell us what your performance constraints are. – David Heffernan Feb 3 '13 at 9:24
    
err.. no, there is a misunderstanding, I do mind to avoid recursion cost. I say that Rob's proposal does not provide better performance than the original recursion, because it re-creates the recursion mecanism. I'll accept Rob solution as a default answer (not possible out of the box), but I was looking for a workaround: see my comment in the question – user315561 Feb 3 '13 at 9:48

In XE8 this works for me:

function GetNextItem(Item: TTreeViewItem): TTreeViewItem;
var
   Parent: TFMXObject;
   Child: TTreeViewItem;
begin
    Result := nil;
    if Item.Count > 0 then
        Result := Item.Items[0]
    else
    begin
        Parent := Item.ParentItem;
        Child := Item;
        while (Result = nil) and (Parent <> nil) do
        begin
           if Parent is TTreeViewItem then
           begin
               if TTreeViewItem(Parent).Count > (Child.Index + 1) then
                   Result := TTreeViewItem(Parent).Items[Child.Index + 1]
               else
               begin
               Child := TTreeViewItem(Parent);
               if Child.ParentItem <> nil then
                   Parent := Child.ParentItem
               else
                   Parent := Child.TreeView;
               end;
           end
           else
           begin
            if TTreeView(Parent).Count > Child.Index + 1 then
                Result := TTreeView(Parent).Items[Child.Index + 1]
            else
                Parent := nil;
            end;
        end;
    end;
end;
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