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Here is some test code which demos my problem:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace EFGraphInsertLookup
{
    public class GraphLookup
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public string Code { get; set; }
    }

    public class GraphChild
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public virtual GraphRoot Root { get; set; }
        public virtual GraphLookup Lookup { get; set; }
    }

    public class GraphRoot
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<GraphChild> Children { get; set; }
    }

    public class TestDbContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<GraphRoot>   GraphRoots    { get; set; }
        public DbSet<GraphChild>  GraphChildren { get; set; }
        public DbSet<GraphLookup> GraphLookups  { get; set; }

        public TestDbContext()
        {
            GraphLookups.ToList();
        }
    }

    public class TestDbInit : DropCreateDatabaseAlways<TestDbContext>
    {
        protected override void Seed(TestDbContext context)
        {
            base.Seed(context);
            context.GraphLookups.Add(new GraphLookup { Code = "Lookup" });
            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }

    [TestFixture]
    public class Tests
    {
        [Test]
        public void MainTest()
        {
            Database.SetInitializer<TestDbContext>(new TestDbInit());

            var lookupCtx = new TestDbContext();
            var firstLookup = lookupCtx.GraphLookups.Where(l => l.Code == "Lookup").Single();

            var graph = new GraphRoot
            {
                Children = new List<GraphChild> { new GraphChild { Lookup = firstLookup } }
            };
            var ctx = new TestDbContext();
            ctx.GraphRoots.Add(graph); // Creates a new lookup record, which is not desired
            //ctx.GraphRoots.Attach(graph); // Crashes due to dupe lookup IDs
            ctx.SaveChanges();

            ctx = new TestDbContext();
            graph = ctx.GraphRoots.Single();
            Assert.AreEqual(1, graph.Children.First().Lookup.ID, "New lookup ID was created...");
        }
    }
}

My desire is to have GraphLookup act as a lookup table, where records are linked to other records, but records are never created through the applicaiton.

The problem I'm having is when the lookup entity is loaded in a different context, for example when it is being cached. So the context doing the save of the Record isn't tracking that entity, and when the Add is called on the GraphRoot DbSet is called, the lookup ends up with an EntityState of Added, but really it should be Unchanged.

If I instead try to use attach, there is a crash due to duplicate keys because two lookup entities end up in the context.

What is the best way to solve this? Note that I've simplified the actual problem quite a bit. In my actual application, this is occuring through several different layers of repositories, units of work, and business service classes that are sitting on top of the EF DBContext. So a generic solution that I can apply somehow in the DBContext would be much preferred.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are bringing existing entities (e.g. from a cache) into another DbContext you will have to manage the entity state explicitly. This leads to two simple conclusions: don't mix entities from multiple contexts unless you really need to, and when you do, explicitly set the entity state of everything that you attach.

One approach to caching you might try is this. Create a simple cache manager class, maybe static. For each entity type that you want to cache, have a GetMyEntity(int myEntityId, DbContext context) method that looks something like this:

public MyEntity GetMyEntity(int entityId, MyContext context)
{
    MyEntity entity;

    // Get entity from context if it's already loaded.
    entity = context.Set<MyEntity>().Loaded.SingleOrDefault(q => q.EntityId == entityId);

    if (entity != null)
    {
        return entity;
    }
    else if (this.cache.TryGetValue("MYENTITY#" + entityId.ToString(), out entity)
    {
        // Get entity from cache if it's present.  Adapt this to whatever cache API you're using.
        context.Entry(entity).EntityState = EntityState.Unchanged;
        return entity;
    }
    else
    {
        // Load entity if it's not in the context already or in the cache.
        entity = context.Set<MyEntity>().Find(entityId);

        // Add loaded entity to the cache.  Adapt this to specify suitable rules for cache item expiry if appropriate.
        this.cache["MYENTITY#" + entityId.ToString()] = entity;
        return entity;
    }
}

Please excuse any typos, but hopefully you get the idea. You can probably see that this could be generalised so you don't have to have one method per entity type either.

Edit:

The following code might be useful to show how you could detach everything except the entity you actually want added.

// Add a single entity.
context.E1s.Add(new1);

var dontAddMeNow = (from e in context.ChangeTracker.Entries()
                    where !object.ReferenceEquals(e.Entity, new1)
                    select e).ToList();

foreach (var e in dontAddMeNow)
{
    e.State = System.Data.EntityState.Unchanged;  // Or Detached.
}

Edit2:

Here is the code to show how pre-loading the reference data can work around your problem.

E2 child = new E2 { Id = 1 };

context.Entry(child).State = System.Data.EntityState.Unchanged;

E1 new1 = new E1
{
    Child = child
};

// Add a single entity.
context.E1s.Add(new1);

Debug.Assert(context.Entry(new1.Child).State == System.Data.EntityState.Unchanged);
Debug.Assert(context.Entry(new1).State == System.Data.EntityState.Added);
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense, Olly. I was hoping to find something where I could fix up the state after adds have occurred, but before SaveChanges. That way consumer code wouldn't have to change. Also, caching is not the only time when I have this issue. It can also occur when the UI loads lookups, say into a dropdown, and then pushes those lookups into a add. – RationalGeek Feb 1 '13 at 15:36
    
@RationalGeek - Right. There probably isn't a "magic bullet" to solve this one. It's a case where EF isn't in a position to work out what you're trying to do; it makes a best guess. – Olly Feb 1 '13 at 19:54
    
@RationalGeek - Conceptually, if you have something like a repository that internally makes use of an EF context, your callers shouldn't have to worry about obeying certain rules to avoid EF errors. Therefore, the code that uses EF must take responsibility for setting entity states appropriately. And only it is in a position to know what is "reference" data and what is "transaction" data. The former needs to have its state set to Unchanged (or be detached altogether). And I like the idea from soadyp of loading "reference" data into the context in advanced so it never gets marked to add. – Olly Feb 1 '13 at 20:03
    
I agree with this conceptually. I'm having hard time figuring out exactly how to get there. But yes I agree on that approach. – RationalGeek Feb 1 '13 at 20:05
    
Regarding loading reference data ahead of time, I can't seem to make that work. Even if I load it ahead of time, I still end up with reference entities with a state of added. – RationalGeek Feb 1 '13 at 20:06

is the Lookup defined as Foreign key ? Is this code first ? If so try changing child to have the LookupID not just navigation property.
Then Supply the GraphLookiD Only. (better for performance since lookup entity doesnt need to be loaded first.)

public class GraphChild
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int GraphLookupId  { get; set; } //<<<<< add this an SET ONLY this
    public virtual GraphRoot Root { get; set; }
    public virtual GraphLookup Lookup { get; set; }
}

the fluent api snippet for entity GraphCHILD

  .HasRequired(x => x.Lookup).WithMany().HasForeignKey(x => x.graphlookupID);

OR

if you want to get the current approach to work you might try Attach the Lookup item to the Context FIRST. make sure it isnt marked for then add the graph ;)

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea. It will probably work. Unfortunately, I have no guarantee that consumers of my business services will only set the ID. But I can at least use this to solve specific cases when they are identified. – RationalGeek Feb 1 '13 at 15:33

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