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I was told it is necessary to set the onload function before setting src for an image object. I've searched in SO for this.

I found this code:

var img = new Image();
img.src = 'image.jpg';
img.onload = function () {
    document.body.appendChild(img);
};

But most people believe that onload should be written before src like this:

var img = new Image();
img.onload = function () {
    document.body.appendChild(img);
};
img.src = 'image.jpg';

MUST it be written in this order? Are there any cases when the above code will cause an error (like if an image is too big)?

If you anyone can show me some examples, I will be very appreciate.

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1  
I guess IE bugs out on this one. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 1 '13 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is my experience that you MUST set onload first (I am the person telling OP about this issue) - especially in IE

If you get issues about the cached image not firing, add +"?"+new Date().getTime() when you set the src next time to avoid cache.

Here is the example from MDN which also uses the order I have suggested

Creating an image from scratch

Another SO link image.onload not firing twice in IE7

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yes, it's me. Thank you for the link. –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 14:54
    
what do you think about this question? stackoverflow.com/questions/7552629/… –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 15:27
    
I my many years experience with JS (more years than the image object existed) the onload MUST be before the src is set. In all browsers I have used it works. In MANY browsers I have used it does not work the other way around and it is not until today in Chrome I saw it working in your fiddle –  mplungjan Feb 1 '13 at 15:33
    
I believe this way can avoid many issues, though the other way works in some case. So I would accept you post. –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 15:42
1  
I think the answer is that although implementations differ between browsers, you must set the onload first if you want it to behave consistently. –  numbers1311407 Feb 1 '13 at 15:43

It doesn't have to, but if setting the src and the image loads before your handler is attached, it won't fire.

JavaScript operates asynchronously. Setting the src will cause the web browser to load the image outside the main execution flow. If onload isn't set at the time that operation completes - which could be between setting src and onload.

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Could the load event happen during script execution? Note the code sample does not return between setting the handler and the source. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 1 '13 at 14:39
    
I can't understand clear, could you explain it more detailed? –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 14:41
    
Is it that JavaScript runs async? Or that it sometimes runs unexpectedly sync? As @JanDvorak suggests, if you're talking async, the expectation would be that the onload would run on the next frame, not in the middle of the executing script. I honestly do not know, so I'm asking, but it seems like the onload might be fired sync by some browsers if the image is already loaded, hence the need to define it first. –  numbers1311407 Feb 1 '13 at 15:06
    
E.g. this fiddle (obviously not how Image.src= is defined, but illustrates what I mean), even though the onload is fired with an immediate timeout, it still fires when defined after. –  numbers1311407 Feb 1 '13 at 15:07
    
what do you think about this question? stackoverflow.com/questions/7552629/… –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 15:27

The browser will start downloading the image asychronously as soon as you assign a src, so there is the possibility the download could complete before you attach the onload event handler and never fire the code to add the image to the DOM.

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Most browser fire the load event imediatly if the image if the image is cached. However, Internet explorer 7 won't fire it at all. That's why it's better to set the src first.

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Not in my experience at all! - this one backs me up stackoverflow.com/questions/1038327/… –  mplungjan Feb 1 '13 at 14:57
    
It says exactly what i'm saying ... "t's caused because IE will cache the image, and the onload event will never fire after it's already been loaded." –  Jean-Georges Feb 1 '13 at 16:16
    
It does not follow that it is better to set src first. If you need it to run again, you just set the src to something + "?"+new Date().getTime() or similar –  mplungjan Feb 1 '13 at 17:14
    
I don't see your point, i think you're doing this just to get your solution to the top and that's pretty retarded. Setting additional parameters will only result in more unecessary loading time and server load. –  Jean-Georges Feb 1 '13 at 19:25
    
You do not know me well enough to know my motives. Your suggestion is wrong. That is all. I do not care where my solution is, as long as the one on top is the correct solution. The suggestion with the cache breaker is a valid one is some circumstances. I have 20K rep, I do not really need the 15 I got here. –  mplungjan Feb 1 '13 at 19:48

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