Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDITED: Let us suposse I have two (or more) template functions f and g that uses (some times) types depending on its template parameter:

template<typename T>
some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>::type 
f(const some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>::type&,
  const some_ugly_and_large_or_deeptemplate_struct_1<T>::type&)
{
   // body, that uses perhaps more times my
   // "some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>"
}

template<typename T>
some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_2<T>::type 
g(const some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_2<T>::type&,
  const some_ugly_and_large_or_deeptemplate_struct_2<T>::type&)
{
   // body, that uses perhaps more times my
   // "some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_2<T>"
}

How could I simplify this "type" definition?, for example with any of new C++11's tools? I think only on something like:

template<typename T,
         typename aux = some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>::type>
aux f(const aux&, const aux&)
{
  // body, that uses perhaps more times my
  // "aux" type
}

template<typename T,
         typename aux = some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_2<T>::type>
aux g(const aux&, const aux&)
{
  // body, that uses perhaps more times my
  // "aux" type
}

The problem that I see with this approach is the user can provide his own aux type and not the type that I want.

share|improve this question
1  
To ensure the type is what you want you could use static_assert with std::is_same. –  hmjd Feb 1 '13 at 14:38
    
@hmjd But I should to 'write' two times a line containing some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type and I could have a lot of functions with the same problem (and also that reduces readability). –  Peregring-lk Feb 1 '13 at 14:41
    
with a macro? : #define DEEP_TYPE(T) some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type –  Francois Feb 1 '13 at 14:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you make it a variadic template, the caller has no possibility to define the type parameters listed after:

template<typename T,
         typename..., // firewall, absorbs all supplied arguments
         typename aux = some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>::type>
aux f(const aux&, const aux&)
{
  // body, that uses perhaps more times my
  // "aux" type
}

Optionally, to prevent calling f accidentally with too many template arguments, one can add a static_assert:

template<typename T,
         typename... F,
         typename aux = some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct_1<T>::type>
aux f(const aux&, const aux&)
{
  static_assert(sizeof...(F)==0, "Too many template arguments");
  // body, that uses perhaps more times my
  // "aux" type
}

Usually, I can live with letting the user define types like aux, being for example the return type where this can save you a cast.

Or you can replace the static_assert with an enable_if:

template<typename T,
         typename... F, typename = typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(F)==0>::type,
         typename aux = some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type,>
aux f(const aux&, const aux&)
{
  // body, that uses perhaps more times my                                               
  // "aux" type                                                                          
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excelent trick the variadic template :) Is it possible to combine the variadic template with a enable_if to erase the static_assert? –  Peregring-lk Feb 2 '13 at 10:30
    
Of course, I completely forgot that. Thanks :) –  ipc Feb 2 '13 at 10:34
    
Is it possible to create a class that make the firewall and the sizeof check, and put this class as template parameter? The idea is simplify it the most possible, because I have the same problem in lots of points of my code. –  Peregring-lk Feb 4 '13 at 12:33

You could declare a template alias alongside the function:

template<typename T> using f_parameter
  = typename some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type;

template<typename T>
f_parameter<T> f(const f_parameter<T>&, const f_parameter<T>&)
{
   f_parameter<T> param;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Better, but this "alias" is defined in the entire compiling unit from its definition point until its end, and perhaps I have diferent functions with diferent f_parameters. –  Peregring-lk Feb 1 '13 at 15:02
    
+1 I was wondering if using would provide a solution here but the syntax escaped me. –  hmjd Feb 1 '13 at 15:07
    
@Peregring-lk so you write f_parameter and g_parameter, possibly placing them in a detail namespace. –  ecatmur Feb 1 '13 at 15:48
    
@hmjd syntax for templates is always crazy hehe –  Peregring-lk Feb 2 '13 at 10:32

You can use something like

namespace f_aux {
   template <typename T> using type = 
            typename some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type;
}

template <typename T>
f_aux::type<T> f(const f_aux::type<T>& , const f_aux::type<T>&);

If the declaration of f is in a suitable namespace or class, you may not need the additional f_aux namespace.

share|improve this answer

A possible solution would be to convert the template function into a template struct with an operator(). For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
struct some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct f
{
    typedef typename some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct<T>::type aux;

    aux operator()(const aux& a1, const aux& a2)
    {
        return a1 + a2;
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << f<int>()(4, 4) << "\n";
    std::cout << f<std::string>()("hello ", "world") << "\n";
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good, but one objections: if do I have lots of functions, and each one with a diferent some_ugly_and_large_or_deep_template_struct? –  Peregring-lk Feb 1 '13 at 14:57
    
@Peregring-lk, I am unsure what you mean exactly? –  hmjd Feb 1 '13 at 14:58
    
I have edited the question making it more specific. –  Peregring-lk Feb 1 '13 at 15:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.