Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my windows forms, I get passed two objects (order and Item)as parameters by business logic and I use different member variables of the two objects to display a line in a custom grid. Similarly to remove a line, business logic passes UI, order and item objects and I use these two to locate a line in windows forms and remove them. The order object is unique always but item object may or may not be unique.

A line is only displayed on a grid if certain conditions are met and while those conditions are not met even though the lines are not displayed but the two objects (order and item) are kept in lists so when the conditions do become true, the line is displayed. Once the line is displayed, if certain conditions are true, the line gets hidden again but like before, both order and item objects are stored for future display.

Currently I keep order objects in an order generic list and item objects in item generic list. When I have to add or remove a line I look up the order object in the order list, find the index, use the same index to retrieve item from item list and use the two objects to display a line. I feel this logic is inherently risky as I am using index from one list to access items from another list and assuming the two list sizes are always the same. Is there a better way of implementing it??

class BusinessLogic
{
    internal void UpdateUI()
    {
        OrderGrid.AddLine(order,item, bAddLine);
    }
}

public class OrderGrid : System.Windows.Forms
{
    ArrayList OrderList = new ArrayList()//This contains unique orders only
    ArrayList ItemList = new ArrayList() //This list can have duplicates

    public void DrawLine(Order order, Item item, bool bAddLine)
    {
        if(bAddLine)
        {
            if(currDisplayedLines <= MaxLinestoDisplay)
            {
                DrawLine(order,item);
            }
            else
            {
                OrderList.Add(order);
                ItemList.Add(item);
            }
        }
        else//remove line
        {
            int idx = OrderList.IndexOf(order);
            if(idx < 0)
                return;
            OrderList.RemoveAt(idx);
            ItemList.RemoveAt(idx);//not a good idea to use another list's index here)
        }
    }

    private void ClockTick()
    {
        if (currDisplayedLines < MaxLinestoDisplay)
        {
            for(int i = 0; i <OrderList.Count; i++)
            {
                while(currDisplayedLines < MaxLinestoDisplay)
                {
                    order = (Order)OrderList[i];
                    item = (Item)ItemList[i];
                    DrawLine(order,item)
                    currDisplayedLines++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Instead of trying to explain what your code does, post the actual code, so we can understand better. –  HighCore Feb 1 '13 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

Any time you have two lists in which the item at the same index of both lists "belong" together you can transform it into a single list of a new type that has two properties, one representing each of the type types. It sounds like making that transformation would be appropriate here. Just make a new type that has a Order and Item property, each of the appropriate type.

share|improve this answer

Why not make another class which holds both references:

class ItemOrderContainer
{
    public Item Item { get; set; }
    public Order Order { get; set; }
    public bool Show { get { return /*some condition*/; }
}

Maybe i missunderstood the question, but it would be good practice to keep things together that belong together. You could still have more than one ItemOrderContainer objects referencing the same Item.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I thought about that, but when business logic sends in order and Item objects to either display the line or remove the line, how will I look them in the container? I'd have to iterate the whole list, which is not desirable as number of lines in the grid and the frequency with which lines are added and removed is pretty fast. –  bsobaid Feb 1 '13 at 15:47
    
do you have some sort of id on your orders? you could keep those containers in a dictionary. I think it would help a lot if you write more about your objects and current "storage situation" in your question. –  Jobo Feb 1 '13 at 16:29
    
ArrayList OrderList = new ArrayList() –  bsobaid Feb 1 '13 at 16:36
1  
@bsobaid You really shouldn't ever use ArrayList. Use the generic List instead, if you need a list data structure. –  Servy Feb 1 '13 at 16:41
    
o snap..I added code but it lost all formatting.. –  bsobaid Feb 1 '13 at 18:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.