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How can I do a for() or foreach() loop in Python and Perl, respectively, that only prints every third index? I need to move every third index to a new array.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Python

print list[::3] # print it
newlist = list[::3] # copy it

Perl

for ($i = 0; $i < @list; $i += 3) {
    print $list[$i]; # print it
    push @y, $list[$i]; # copy it
}
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@friedo: Thanks for the fix :) –  tuergeist Sep 23 '09 at 19:50

Perl:

As with draegtun's answer, but using a count var:

my $i;
my @new = grep {not ++$i % 3} @list;
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7  
And can be nicely put in a do block: my @new = do { my $i; grep {not ++$i % 3} @list }; –  draegtun Sep 23 '09 at 12:45

Perl 5.10 new state variables comes in very handy here:

my @every_third = grep { state $n = 0; ++$n % 3 == 0 } @list;


Also note you can provide a list of elements to slice:

my @every_third = @list[ 2, 5, 8 ];  # returns 3rd, 5th & 9th items in list

You can dynamically create this slice list using map (see Gugod's excellent answer) or a subroutine:

my @every_third = @list[ loop( start => 2, upto => $#list, by => 3  ) ];

sub loop {
    my ( %p ) = @_;
    my @list;

    for ( my $i = $p{start} || 0; $i <= $p{upto}; $i += $p{by} ) {
        push @list, $i;
    }

    return @list;
}


Update:

Regarding runrig's comment... this is "one way" to make it work within a loop:

my @every_third = sub { grep { state $n = 0; ++$n % 3 == 0 } @list }->();

/I3az/

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state is nice. But if you execute that line more than once, it'll only work the first time unless the list length is a multiple of 3. –  runrig Sep 23 '09 at 15:09
    
Well pointed out. Its slightly annoying but not surprising feature of state variables which u can get around by encapsulating in an anonymous sub (see my update). –  draegtun Sep 23 '09 at 18:33
1  
Why not do map { $_ * 3 } 0 .. $MAX / 3 and use that for your slice index? –  Chris Lutz Sep 23 '09 at 18:35
    
Indeed why not. In fact I had already upvoted Gugod's answer on this ;-) I didn't use map because there was already a similar answer here but for some reason it as now been deleted? –  draegtun Sep 23 '09 at 18:44

Python:

for x in a[::3]:
   something(x)
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3  
Beautiful. Python slices give me erections. –  Dominic Bou-Samra Sep 23 '09 at 9:35
3  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diphallia ? –  u0b34a0f6ae Sep 23 '09 at 13:22

Perl:

# The initial array
my @a = (1..100);

# Copy it, every 3rd elements
my @b = @a[ map { 3 * $_ } 0..$#a/3 ];

# Print it. space-delimited
$, = " ";
say @b;
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You could do a slice in Perl.

my @in = ( 1..10 );

# need only 1/3 as many indexes.
my @index = 1..(@in/3);

# adjust the indexes.
$_ = 3 * $_ - 1 for @index;
# These would also work
# $_ *= 3, --$_ for @index;
# --($_ *= 3) for @index

my @out = @in[@index];
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In Perl:

$size = @array; 
for ($i=0; $i<$size; $i+=3)  # or start from $i=2, depends what you mean by "every third index"
{  
        print "$array[$i] ";  
}
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@array = qw(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9);
print @array[(grep { ($_ + 1) % 3 == 0 } (1..$#array))];
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