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I am trying to determine if the results of a jQuery selector (by traversing the DOM) has actually found a DOM element, but I am having some issues. I thought that by checking if the variable was equal to undefined or null would work in this instance, but it has not for me. I feel like I am missing something basic here. Any help is appreciated.

Here is my example.

jsFiddle

HTML

<ul>
    <li>

    </li>
</ul>

<div id="results"></div>

Javascript/jQuery

var
    $element = $("ul li"),
    $parent = $element.parent().closest("li"),//this is the selector that is giving me the issue
    $r = $("#results")//just used to append the results of the if statement below
    ;

$r.append("<br />$parent = " + $parent);
$r.append("<br />typeof $parent = " + typeof $parent);
$r.append("<br />$parent.length = " + $parent.length);
$r.append("<br />$parent[0] = " + $parent[0] + "<br />");//for Chrome

if ($parent === "null") { $r.append("<br />$parent === 'null'") }//not expected to work, just testing
if ($parent === null) { $r.append("<br />$parent === null") }//not expected to work, just testing
if ($parent == null) { $r.append("<br />$parent == null") }//not expected to work, just testing

if ($parent === "undefined") { $r.append("<br />$parent === 'undefined'") }
if ($parent === undefined) { $r.append("<br />$parent === undefined") }
if ($parent == undefined) { $r.append("<br />$parent == undefined") }

if ($parent[0] === "undefined") { $r.append("<br />$parent[0] === 'undefined'") }
if ($parent[0] === undefined) { $r.append("<br />$parent[0] === undefined") }
if ($parent[0] == undefined) { $r.append("<br />$parent[0] == undefined") }

if (typeof $parent === "undefined") { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent === 'undefined'") }
if (typeof $parent === undefined) { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent === undefined") }
if (typeof $parent == undefined) { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent == undefined") }


if (typeof $parent[0] === "undefined") { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent[0] === 'undefined'") }
if (typeof $parent[0] === undefined) { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent[0] === undefined") }
if (typeof $parent[0] == undefined) { $r.append("<br />typeof $parent[0] == undefined") }

if ($parent.length == 0) { $r.append("<br />$parent.length == 0") }

jsFiddle

These returned true; $parent[0] === undefined and $parent[0] == undefined and typeof $parent[0] === 'undefined';

This makes sense since the jQuery selector did not find any DOM objects and there is no element [0]. I only tried this because of using console.log with an object in Chrome needs this. But I do not think that this is correct.

$parent.length == 0 works as expected. But is this needed with a !== undefined' and!== null`?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
"$parent.length == 0 works as expected. But is this needed with a !== undefined and !== null?" Huh?... No. As you stated, it works. There's your answer. –  the system Feb 1 '13 at 16:14
    
$parent.length == 0 can work fine enough. –  pktangyue Feb 1 '13 at 16:18
    
@thesystem, Since $parent did not find an element in the DOM, then I expect $parent.length to equal 0. Right? What I am trying to determine is if $parent is undefined, then should I first check to see if $parent is not null and not undefined? –  JoeFletch Feb 1 '13 at 16:18
    
@pktangyue, then why when I check for $parent == undefined it does nto work? –  JoeFletch Feb 1 '13 at 16:19
2  
@JoeFletch: A jQuery DOM selection will never return undefined or null. It will always return a jQuery object. –  the system Feb 1 '13 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the selector or traversal results in zero matching elements, the length property of the jQuery object will be equal to 0. The standard - and only necessary - method of checking if elements matched is:

jQueryObject.length === 0

All jQuery functions that select elements will themselves return a jQuery object (which contains the matching elements), so it's impossible for the result of that to ever be null or undefined. It will always return an object, and that object will always have a length property.

Looking at your specific example:

var $element = $("ul li"),
    $parent = $element.parent().closest("li")

If there are no <li> elements inside <ul> elements when that code executes, $element will be an empty jQuery object (a jQuery object with a length property equal to 0). Calling $element.parent() will in turn return an empty jQuery object, and then calling .closest('li') will also return an empty jQuery object.

Now, assuming there are <li> elements inside <ul> elements when the code executes; in this case, $element will be a non-empty jQuery object. They'll all have a parent, so calling $parent will return a jQuery object that contains some elements. If, however, none of those elements have a <li> element between them and the document, then .closest('li') will return an empty jQuery object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining the results of a jQuery selector always being an object. –  JoeFletch Feb 1 '13 at 16:25
    
@JoeFletch No problem, it's not necessarily intuitive. Though almost all jQuery functions themselves returning a jQuery object (with the same, or a different, set of elements) is the reason that chaining jQuery functions is possible. –  Anthony Grist Feb 1 '13 at 16:28

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