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How to create timer events using C++ 11?

I need something like: “Call me after 1 second from now”.

Is there any library?

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1  
You should include any code that you have tried. –  Miguel-F Feb 1 '13 at 16:57
1  
See e.g. this old answer of mine. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 1 '13 at 17:01
    
There is a library: boost.asio –  Cubbi Feb 1 '13 at 17:54
    
Thanks Joachim. That is I was looking for. Because I don't have access to the main loop (to check timers) I will have to create a thread. I will use a high resolution timer also. My sleep time will be very short (1 ms) and I hope not to use too much CPU. –  Thiago R. Adams Feb 1 '13 at 20:58
    
What is the problem you are solving where this is your solution? –  GManNickG Feb 1 '13 at 22:24

4 Answers 4

Made a simple implementation of what I believe to be what you want to achieve. You can use the class later with the following arguments:

  • int (milliseconds to wait until to run the code)
  • bool (if true it returns instantly and runs the code after specified time on another thread)
  • variable arguments (exactly what you'd feed to std::bind)

You can change std::chrono::milliseconds to std::chrono::nanoseconds or microseconds for even higher precision and add a second int and a for loop to specify for how many times to run the code.

Here you go, enjoy:

#include <functional>
#include <chrono>
#include <future>
#include <cstdio>

class later
{
public:
    template <class callable, class... arguments>
    later(int after, bool async, callable&& f, arguments&&... args)
    {
        std::function<typename std::result_of<callable(arguments...)>::type()> task(std::bind(std::forward<callable>(f), std::forward<arguments>(args)...));

        if (async)
        {
            std::thread([after, task]() {
                std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(after));
                task();
            }).detach();
        }
        else
        {
            std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(after));
            task();
        }
    }

};

void test1(void)
{
    return;
}

void test2(int a)
{
    printf("%i\n", a);
    return;
}

int main()
{
    later later_test1(1000, false, &test1);
    later later_test2(1000, false, &test2, 101);

    return 0;
}

Outputs after two seconds:

101
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice solution. But why not just a function instead a class? My concern about async is how fast it is to start. Having an exclusive thread running only for timers maybe it is faster. I will measure and then I post here again. –  Thiago R. Adams Feb 2 '13 at 21:43
    
@Thiago R. Adams You're right, it can work as a function too, although class lets you add more functionality to it, as I said, this is just a mere example. You can also make a thread pool with as many threads as the number of cores (std::thread::hardware_concurrency()) and dispatch the timed events to it, etc. –  Edward A Feb 3 '13 at 8:01
    
I did the first test. thradams.com/codeblog/timers.htm I sleep the thread calculating the remaning time to the next timer. If some timer is added I wake up the thread before. –  Thiago R. Adams Feb 3 '13 at 22:11
    
Unfortunately your std::async call won't do what you expect it to. Since you don't want any joining at all, you won't get around starting a detached std::thread yourself instead: std::thread([after, task]() { std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(after)); task(); }).detach();. –  Christian Rau Feb 7 '13 at 9:02
    
@Christian Rau Thanks for pointing out the error. Fixed it. –  Edward A Feb 7 '13 at 9:24

This is the code I have so far:

I am using VC++ 2012 (no variadic templates)

//header
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <memory>
#include <algorithm>

template<class T>
class TimerThread
{
  typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock clock_t;

  struct TimerInfo
  {
    clock_t::time_point m_TimePoint;
    T m_User;

    template <class TArg1>
    TimerInfo(clock_t::time_point tp, TArg1 && arg1)
      : m_TimePoint(tp)
      , m_User(std::forward<TArg1>(arg1))
    {
    }

    template <class TArg1, class TArg2>
    TimerInfo(clock_t::time_point tp, TArg1 && arg1, TArg2 && arg2)
      : m_TimePoint(tp)
      , m_User(std::forward<TArg1>(arg1), std::forward<TArg2>(arg2))
    {
    }
  };

  std::unique_ptr<std::thread> m_Thread;
  std::vector<TimerInfo>       m_Timers;
  std::mutex                   m_Mutex;
  std::condition_variable      m_Condition;
  bool                         m_Sort;
  bool                         m_Stop;

  void TimerLoop()
  {
    for (;;)
    {
      std::unique_lock<std::mutex>  lock(m_Mutex);

      while (!m_Stop && m_Timers.empty())
      {
        m_Condition.wait(lock);
      }

      if (m_Stop)
      {
        return;
      }

      if (m_Sort)
      {
        //Sort could be done at insert
        //but probabily this thread has time to do
        std::sort(m_Timers.begin(),
                  m_Timers.end(),
                  [](const TimerInfo & ti1, const TimerInfo & ti2)
        {
          return ti1.m_TimePoint > ti2.m_TimePoint;
        });
        m_Sort = false;
      }

      auto now = clock_t::now();
      auto expire = m_Timers.back().m_TimePoint;

      if (expire > now) //can I take a nap?
      {
        auto napTime = expire - now;
        m_Condition.wait_for(lock, napTime);

        //check again
        auto expire = m_Timers.back().m_TimePoint;
        auto now = clock_t::now();

        if (expire <= now)
        {
          TimerCall(m_Timers.back().m_User);
          m_Timers.pop_back();
        }
      }
      else
      {
        TimerCall(m_Timers.back().m_User);
        m_Timers.pop_back();
      }
    }
  }

  template<class T, class TArg1>
  friend void CreateTimer(TimerThread<T>& timerThread, int ms, TArg1 && arg1);

  template<class T, class TArg1, class TArg2>
  friend void CreateTimer(TimerThread<T>& timerThread, int ms, TArg1 && arg1, TArg2 && arg2);

public:
  TimerThread() : m_Stop(false), m_Sort(false)
  {
    m_Thread.reset(new std::thread(std::bind(&TimerThread::TimerLoop, this)));
  }

  ~TimerThread()
  {
    m_Stop = true;
    m_Condition.notify_all();
    m_Thread->join();
  }
};

template<class T, class TArg1>
void CreateTimer(TimerThread<T>& timerThread, int ms, TArg1 && arg1)
{
  {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(timerThread.m_Mutex);
    timerThread.m_Timers.emplace_back(TimerThread<T>::TimerInfo(TimerThread<T>::clock_t::now() + std::chrono::milliseconds(ms),
                                      std::forward<TArg1>(arg1)));
    timerThread.m_Sort = true;
  }
  // wake up
  timerThread.m_Condition.notify_one();
}

template<class T, class TArg1, class TArg2>
void CreateTimer(TimerThread<T>& timerThread, int ms, TArg1 && arg1, TArg2 && arg2)
{
  {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(timerThread.m_Mutex);
    timerThread.m_Timers.emplace_back(TimerThread<T>::TimerInfo(TimerThread<T>::clock_t::now() + std::chrono::milliseconds(ms),
                                      std::forward<TArg1>(arg1),
                                      std::forward<TArg2>(arg2)));
    timerThread.m_Sort = true;
  }
  // wake up
  timerThread.m_Condition.notify_one();
}

//sample
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void TimerCall(int i)
{
  std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << "start" << std::endl;
  TimerThread<int> timers;

  CreateTimer(timers, 2000, 1);
  CreateTimer(timers, 5000, 2);
  CreateTimer(timers, 100, 3);

  std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(5));
  std::cout << "end" << std::endl;
}
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I found a problem. The mutex must be unlocked before TimerCall. –  Thiago R. Adams Feb 4 '13 at 18:34
8  
way too complicated –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 9:29

This question is very context driven. Categorically : a) Do you want an Asynchronous timer based callback: You need another thread to maintain a priority queue based on time intervals and that thread can sleep based on the least time on its priority queue.

b) Do you want a NON-BLOCKING timer based callback ( single-threaded ) : Typically this is required for single threaded servers where you are listening on sockets to serve clients. Worker threads might be there to serve each requests. But you want timer to run NON-BLOCKING mode. Then you can have select / epoll etc... to listen on sockets and create fd based timers using timerfd_create().

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You can use the concurrency::timer class to schedule a callback without needing to worry about thread management and without blocking the current thread.

#include <iostream>
#include <agents.h>
#include <ppltasks.h>

template <class T>
void call_after(const T& callback, unsigned int timeInMs)
{
    concurrency::task_completion_event<void> tce;
    auto call = new concurrency::call<int>(
        [callback, tce](int)
        {
            callback();
            tce.set();
        });

    auto timer = new concurrency::timer<int>(timeInMs, 0, call, false);
    concurrency::task<void> event_set(tce);
    event_set.then([timer, call]()
    {
        delete call;
        delete timer;
    });

    timer->start();
}

int main()
{
    std::function<void()> callback = []{ std::cout << "in callback\n"; };
    call_after(callback, 1000);
    std::cin.get();
}

Also check out this article.

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