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I have a form that I don't want to be submitted the first time submit is clicked, but the second time it should work like a normal submit. So I added a not-submittable class to the form on load, then after the first click remove that class... which should (I think) make it submit normally. But, this doesn't happen. The first click works as expected, removes the class and changes the button text. The second click, however, does the exact same thing. So, what am I missing here?

jQuery:

  $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').addClass('not-submittable');

  $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE.not-submittable').click(function(event) {
      $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeClass('not-submittable');
      $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').val('Continue');
      $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeAttr('disabled');
    return false;
  });

Pre-javascript button:

<input type="submit" class="Button" value="Submit Survey" id="ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE" name="ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE">
share|improve this question
    
You'll need to test for the existence of the class and act accordingly. –  Jay Blanchard Feb 1 '13 at 16:41
2  
Look into jQuery .one() instead. You can use it to do something one time. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 16:41
2  
NITPICK Do not keep doing $(...) over and over again. Use chaining or store it into a variable. Doing the same look up over and over again is SLOW. –  epascarello Feb 1 '13 at 16:42
    
@Jay, isn't the class tested for in the .click function since I specified #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE.not-submittable? @Sparky, I can't use .one due to how the rest of the code works. @epascarello, I do chain where I can, this is just stripped down code I'm using for figuring out this problem. The above is actually dozens of lines apart. –  Samsquanch Feb 1 '13 at 16:43
    
Makes no sense... then show more code. Just use one() to block submit using a preventdefault(); any other code should still work. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 16:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do something like this

 $(document).ready(function () {

         $('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').click(function (event) {
             if (!$('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').hasClass(".not-submittable")) {

                 //do all conditions you wish on first click

                 //if condidition meets add this class to button
                 $('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').addClass(".not-submittable");

                 //stop form submit
                 event.preventDefault();
             }
             else {

                 //calls when button have .not-submittable class may be second or any no of clicks
                 $('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeClass('not-submittable');
                 $('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').val('Continue');
                 $('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeAttr('disabled');
                 //commented return false so form submits normally
             }
         });

     });    
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up going with something similar to this. Although I realize the wording of my original question was not ideal, this was the only thing that ended up working as expected. Specifically I used: if(!$(this).hasClass('not-submittable')) { return true; } –  Samsquanch Feb 1 '13 at 17:05
    
Good to see my answer help you solve your problem –  Fraz Sundal Feb 1 '13 at 18:00

Quote OP: "I have a form that I don't want to be submitted the first time submit is clicked, but the second time it should work like a normal submit."

Use jQuery .one() to block the submit on first click only.

http://api.jquery.com/one/

$('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').one('submit', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    // do what you need to do on first click
}

Alternatively...

$('#ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').one('submit', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    // do what you need to do on first click
    if ( some-condition ) {  // under certain conditions allow submit on first click
        $(this).submit();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Shortest code. Maybe you could add that he can use $(this).removeAttr() (as an example) inside the function. –  insertusernamehere Feb 1 '13 at 16:50
    
@insertusernamehere, thank-you. I'll leave it up to the reader to insert whatever they want on my commented line. Apparently the OP can't use this solution anyway. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 16:53
1  
@insertusernamehere, still not understanding why he can't make this simple solution work. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 16:56
1  
@ZacharyKniebel, I'm only answering the question as presented. If the OP wants to contradict his own question within the comments, then good luck to him. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 17:07
1  
@ZacharyKniebel, IMO, I think edits that change the entire meaning of the question should be left up to the OP. It's a bad enough practice when the OP turns a question into a chameleon, I don't think it should be encouraged for others to it to another's OP. –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 17:12

Instead of using .click(), try using the .on() and .off() methods to bind and unbind the event. In your case:

$('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE.not-submittable').on("click.stopSubmit", function(event) {

    $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeClass('not-submittable');
    $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').val('Continue');
    $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE').removeAttr('disabled');

    if (...conditions are met.....) {
        $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE.not-submittable').off("click.stopSubmit");
    }

    return false;
});

You may notice that the first parameter of the .on() method is the string representation of the handler, but that I appended the namespace ".stopSubmit". Namespacing your handlers allows you to unbind one specific click handler, rather than all click handlers. The best part about this is that if there is code in your original handler that you still want to use you can make a separate click handler to run that code, and it will not be unbound when you unbind the ".stopSubmit" handler.

Please note that .on() and .off() are the recommended bind/unbind methods - jQuery no longer recommends .bind() and .unbind().


UPDATE
After reading your comment about not unbinding until after certain conditions are met, I would would like to point out that you can insert the .off() call in a conditional. I have updated the code to reflect this.

share|improve this answer
1  
If he could use .on() and .off(), then why can't he use .one() instead? –  Sparky Feb 1 '13 at 16:46
    
I was suggestign .on() and .off() in case there was other code in the method that he wants to still run after he stops the code that prevents the submit. Essentially, .on() and .off() will make it more extensible. The .one() method is a valid solution, though. –  Zachary Kniebel Feb 1 '13 at 16:49

If there are certain criteria that must match use this where submitable contains your logic what makes it possible to send the form:

var submit = $('form#survey_7042 #ACTION_SUBMIT_SURVEY_RESPONSE');
submit.addClass('not-submittable');

submit.click(function(event) {
    if (true == submitable) {
        submit.removeClass('not-submittable').val('Continue').removeAttr('disabled');
        submit.unbind();
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});
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