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char str[33] = "";
snprintf(str, sizeof str, "%s%s%s%s", preg->opbits,preg->rsbits,preg->rtbits,preg->ibits);
char *instruction = &str[0]

I am trying to build a binary string from the different elements of a string representation of a MIPS assembly instruction which is 32 bits long, where opbits is the 6 bit opcode, rsbits is the 5 bit number of the first source register, rtbits is the 5 bit number of the destination register for the immediate (i) type instruction and ibits represents the 16 bit integer value. I wish to concatenate these into a character array then assign a pointer to the first element of that array the pointer can be passed to an already defined function converting a number written as a string (in a specified base which is also passed to the strtoint function) to an integer value.

My main question is, do I need to account for the null bytes at the end of every string to be concatenated and second of all, would this work?

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6+6+6+16 = 34, so maybe you should have char str[35] = "";, but you don't need to account for the 0-bytes of each part, only the one for the result. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 1 '13 at 16:42
    
I'd worry more about null characters inside the machine opcode data. Also, do you mean to pack the various 6-bit fields? There's nothing in the snprintf() that's doing anything along those lines. –  Michael Burr Feb 1 '13 at 18:48
    
sorry, the register numbers are 5 bits long, not 6. –  wsmccusker Feb 2 '13 at 15:15
    
keep in mind though, If you're building up binary blobs, snprintf is not suitable as it deals with text. –  nos Feb 2 '13 at 15:42
    
the bit's are stored as a character string, not as numbers. So it is dealing with text. I need to print out the binary string first, then the string is to be passed into a function which I already have which takes the string and the base of the number represented in the string and returns an integer value, which I can then print out as a hex value. –  wsmccusker Feb 3 '13 at 19:53
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1 Answer

My main question is, do I need to account for the null bytes at the end of every string to be concatenated and second of all, would this work?

No you do not have to count a null character for every sub string, you have to add only 1 null character for the result string concatenation

So if the length of your string result is 32 + 1 (null character) = 33

So your definition is OK if the length of your result conctaned string is 32

char str[33] = "";
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